Keith Clayborne

Keith was editor and publisher of The Broward Times

Load simulation...

Will your job even exist in a thousand years? If so, in what form? If some kind of machine were to replace you, what would it be called?

The role of a journalist will continue throughout humanity. Man's thirst to chronicle history -- to communicate his daily exploits, to impact the masses, report the issues, problems -- to describe and capture our community spirit and lives will always be important. I don't think journalists will be anchored to bricks and mortar. As communications technology improves, we will become true roving reporters, funneling stories to niche-defined servers for dissemination by local media. But no machine could ever replace human feelings or sense the mood of a nation, community, or neighborhood. It won't advocate for the disadvantaged or speak for those who can't speak for themselves. Journalists serve as a live conduit between people.

Which events from the year 2001 will still be talked about a thousand years from now? How will history interpret -- or misinterpret -- those events?

The devastation of AIDS and its impact on the world community. It will be right up there with the Black Death that ravaged Europe in the Middle Ages. I think historians will verify that AIDS was a man-made disease developed to decimate the black populations of the world. It was developed to thin the herd, if you will, of a burgeoning populace. Without question it's genocide. Fortunately brown and black people throughout the world will survive this man-made plague.

What will South Florida look like one millennium from now?

We only need look to our neighbors to the south -- the Caribbean and South America -- to visualize South Florida one millennium from now. The entire population will be comprised of brown and black people. Whites will flee to the Midwest, the Northeast, and the western United States. The population of much of the South will be made up of brown and black citizens.

What will human beings look like?

We'll look in 3001 pretty much like we look today with a few modifications. We'll be healthier due to modern science, but we won't hesitate to make changes to enhance our attractiveness. It'll be like the auto industry: Each of us will continue to come in a base model; some of us will be able to afford Cadillac enhancements, others BMW, while the masses will continue to be Chevys and Fords. Unfortunately, even in the year 3001, money will be the determining factor of our quality of life.

Which South Florida tourist attractions will stand the test of time, and which will disappear? What will the new tourist traps look like?

I think the Atlantic Ocean will stand the test of time and pretty much anything along the side of it. We might also have a bridge to Cuba, and the proliferation of casino gambling throughout South Florida. With increased competition throughout the United States and the world for tourist dollars -- and our changing demographics -- there's a real possibility we'll become the Las Vegas of the South.

 
My Voice Nation Help
 
Loading...