Flip Out!

You're getting creepy... very creepy

THU 6/30

Don't look into Flip Orley's eyes.
Don't look into Flip Orley's eyes.
Say Anything won't be on TRL anytime soon.
Say Anything won't be on TRL anytime soon.
Latin-flavored R&B comes to Pompano Beach.
Mike Gorman
Latin-flavored R&B comes to Pompano Beach.
Would you like some Tuna with your folk-rock?
Would you like some Tuna with your folk-rock?

He helped you quit smoking, and he got rid of your fat ass. Who is he? He's your hypnotist! Now it's time to let him make you laugh by tapping into others' inner silliness. That's right, the jaw-dropping comedian-hypnotist Flip Orley is in town, and he wants to put you under. And even if you suffer from hypnophobia (the fear of sleep), you can still enjoy the embarrassment of others (it's OK to be a chickenshit). Since Orley got started almost 20 years ago, he's been putting people to sleep with his act. Not a good sign for your average standup -- but in Orley's case, it's essential. His blend of comedy and hypnosis will send you into the nether realms of the belly laugh -- and you won't want to come back.

Having perfected his technique on guinea-pig audiences all over the world, Orley (a.k.a. Hypnoman) is able to do something most comics can't -- deliver a new show each time. One of the remarkable aspects of his form of comedy is that no two shows are alike because the audience is the act (or, rather, the audiences act out whatever Orley can summon). But the comic is not interested in the usual dog-and-pony (and chicken-and-milk-cow) show in which audience members embarrass themselves by making barnyard noises or anything else the comic considers "mean, obvious, or humiliating." Instead, Orley uses his comedic ability and hypnotic skills to achieve the overall effect of hilarity. So if you're worried he might make you tell your spouse what you really did last night, don't sweat it. (Though, it may be a good idea to sit way in the back.)

Skeptical? Try it, you might like the man whose numerous TV appearances include Entertainment Tonight, the Today Show, and the Ricki Lake Show. Orley performs Thursday through Sunday at the Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace (550 S. Rosemary Ave., Ste. 250, West Palm Beach). Thursday's show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $15.97. Call 561-833-1812, or visit www.palmbeachimprov.com. -- John Shannon

Play Anything

Labels are for Rock Stars

SAT 7/2

There's a new band hittin' the national scene, and its attitude is quite surprising, to say the least. With influences like Elliott Smith, Nirvana, and the Beatles, it would be easy to say that Los Angeles rockers Say Anything sound like Band A mixed with Band B, except that it wouldn't be fair to pigeonhole them. Say Anything combines these styles into one big mix of heavy riffs and contemplative lyrics. Lead singer Max Bemis has a profound understanding of the not selling out ideal that eludes many bands these days. The guys turned down major-label offers to be the next Blink-182, instead sticking with indie label Doghouse Records. Yet at the same time, you can't help thinking their nonconformity is an example of how to better stand in line in a world in which everyone is busy complaining about conformists. Someone's got to practice what they preach. Either way, Say Anything writes some damned catchy songs with plenty of woh-woh-wohs that sound even better live. The band headlines a 6 p.m. show with Circa Survive, Emanuel, and Mashlin at Ray's Downtown (519 Clematis St., West Palm Beach). Tickets cost $8. Call 561-835-1577. -- Jake Smith

Bashin' the R&B

Looking tough and showing heart

SAT 7/2

At a time when Michael Jackson isn't that popular but better-known than ever, R&B singer Frankie J boldly claims that the first song he ever performed live was "Billie Jean" at 6 years old for his parents -- but with a sombrero instead of a top hat. This practice moved him right into Selena's brother's band, Kumbia Kings -- the Mexican-American equivalent of 'NSync or O-Town. From there, Frankie J was playing to crowds as large as 100,000, but he really just wanted to return to R&B and use his glass-cracking falsetto to swoon the ladies. Frankie's labelmate and partner in rhyme, Baby Bash, has dubbed himself a chameleon who can transcend the realm of sticky-sweet R&B. He has pulled rhythm, pop, reggae, and rap together for his own sound, saying, "Wherever I'm at, I'll fit in." The two performers, along with singer Natalie, take the stage during the Latin-flavored Latium Entertainment tour Saturday at the Pompano Beach Amphitheatre (1806 NE Sixth St., Pompano Beach). The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $28.50. Call 954-946-2402, or visit www.latiument.com. -- Jake Smith

Hot Tuneage

SAT 7/2

It's a three-day weekend! Canada Day is Friday! Independence Day is Monday!! Feel the freedom, spread the love, buy a couple of tickets and give your sweetie, your best friend, or your dad a token of affection. (Giving's not just for Christmas, you know.) Speaking of tokin', here's where you are in luck, especially if you long for the real independence days, when everybody was smoking the reefer and listening to "White Rabbit." Hot Tuna -- a multidecade-spanning, electric blues-rock band -- is being served up at Revolution (200 W. Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale). One half of the Tuna sandwich -- guitarist Jorma Kaukonen -- was a founder of Jefferson Airplane before hooking up with bass whiz Jack Casady. What began as an unplugged offshoot of the Airplane grew to a full lineup of musicians. Add 45 years of experience performing, plus a mandolinist, and you have some fresh-off-the-griddle jams. Say what you will about Kaukonen, but at least he steered clear of Jefferson Starship. Tickets cost $22 to $24. Call 954-727-0950, or visit www.jointherevolution.net. -- Jamie Laughlin

 
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