Artbeat

Capsule reviews of current area art exhibitions.

As a part of the fascinating mishmash that is Boca Raton's Gallery Center in the summer, Rosenbaum Contemporary (one of seven smaller galleries under one giant golf-umbrella of an arts center) is displaying works culled from many of last season's shows. It will make you sorry you missed them. Anchoring the front wall is the fantastic Forest and Houses by Jennifer Bartlett. A deviation from her normal grid-like painted panels, the piece is done in the style of Chuck Close. It looks abstract up close, and the image comes together from a distance. For Close fans, his portrait of sculptor John Chamberlain, who incidentally also has a piece in the gallery, hangs in the center's common hallway. A word about the gallery itself -- it's open and well-lit like galleries in New York, but it's small. Each show contains about 20 pieces. But the space is perfect for showcasing quality, which the gallery has in spades. Pieces from Rosenbaum's December "Pop Art" show aren't on the main walls but are worth seeking out. Jim Dine's Yolk, three red hearts varying from life-like to the one we all learn to make in grade school, haunts an adjoining office, along with a few of Tom Wesselman's nudes. Waiting in the main space are prints by Matisse and Picasso, as well as a selection of pottery Picasso created while in Vallauris, France. Throw in prints by abstract expressionist Robert Motherwell and a spectacular, splashy painting, Monkey Rope by minimalist Frank Stella that's part of a Moby Dick series and you've got a gallery that makes you seethe with envy and beg to sign the guestbook. So you won't miss the shows next time. (Rosenbaum Contemporary, Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trl., Boca Raton. Call 561-994-9180, or visit www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com.)

Now on Display

Angry Snowman by Jennifer Bartlett piles on the circles.
Angry Snowman by Jennifer Bartlett piles on the circles.

The best reason to visit Art Expressions right now is a small but powerful one-woman show, "Selene Vasquez: In No Strange Land." About two dozen acrylic paintings by the Hollywood-based Vasquez take up nearly half of this tiny Fort Lauderdale gallery, which has been open in an easy-to-miss strip mall since March 2004. Works by a handful of other artists are also on display, most notably the mosaics of Mike Bauman, who applies shards of mirrors and colored, textured glass to mannequins and other forms. But Vasquez is the current featured artist for the gallery, which co-owner Francisco Sheuat (an artist himself) says highlights a different local artist every month or so. Most of Vasquez's work here emphasizes the human face, although she insists she isn't a portrait painter. "I make heads," she says in her artist's statement. "The reproduction of features is an almost superficial task and I maintain minimal allegiance to realism. What I favor is distortion in the brushstroke and a palette of forceful colors to probe the interior." Indeed, Vasquez is far less interested in how someone looks than she is in how to use human features to suggest various emotional and mental states -- she's an heir to classic expressionism. In such aptly titled pieces as The Grimace and The Illness, she creates haunted-looking faces with minimal details to conjure up generic human conditions. In Phobia #1 and Phobia #2, she seems to be channeling Edvard Munch with a pair of pale, gaunt faces that are almost identical except for gender. Often, Vasquez floats her heads on a background of intense color, and she likes to create texture by raking or scratching the surface of the painted canvas. Like the stylized squiggles used to convey sensation in comics, her radiating lines suggest tension, anxiety, pain. The show also includes a couple of nude torsos and four animal paintings, but Vasquez clearly realizes that her strong suit is the human face. (Through July 15 at Art Expressions, 1212 NE Fourth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-527-7700.)

The Hollywood All-Media Juried Biennial was established just two years ago by the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood's ever-resourceful curator of exhibitions, Samantha Salzinger, and already she's tweaking it. This year, artists working in film were eligible to compete, with awards given for Best Short Film (Kinesis - First Movement, from Loitering Goat Productions) and Best Feature Film (Mark Moorman's Tom Dowd and the Language of Music) as selected by juror Dinorah de Jesus Rodriguez, a filmmaker who's currently an artist in residence at the Bass Museum of Art in Miami Beach. The rest of the exhibition includes the work of roughly 30 artists, culled from nearly 200 entries. Juror Nick Cindric, director of Miami's Rocket Projects Gallery, picked the award winners and a handful of honorable mentions. Some of his choices seem willfully perverse, so that the exhibition comes off as a reminder that there's no accounting for taste when it comes to juried art competitions. Look for strong contributions from Matthew Cox, Iris Even, Christina Pettersson, and Carol Prusa, (Through July 10 at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood, 1650 Harrison St., Hollywood. Call 954-921-3274.)

Magdalena Abakanowicz's 95 Figures stand in diagonal rows, like bronze sentinels, on the second floor of the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale. The human-sized sculptures provoke a heavy sense of foreboding. Some take a step; others are static; they're all headless and armless. The work is easy to appreciate for its size, the precision of the figures' placement, and its ability to draw a visceral reaction. The urge to climb in and stand among the figures, to be amid the crowd and absorb the mob's purpose, is almost irresistible. At the same time, the work provides no pleasure or enjoyment. There are five other pieces displayed with the figures. One at the end of the hall leading to the exhibit, The Second Never Seen Figure on Beam with Wheels, is looming and unique, a perfect counterpoint to the crowd. (Through October 30 at the Museum of Art, One E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-525-5500.)

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