The Continental

Europimp Tonino Carotone believes Another World Is Possible.

So you're wondering how the world's most iconoclastic thinkers feel about America's full-court press toward globalization. And like any savvy rabble-rouser, you're also looking for a few good tunes by globe-spanning artists. Do yourself a favor and pick up Another World Is Possible, an absorbing compilation by the politically minded French label Uncivilized World. Along with music from Lee Scratch Perry, Massive Attack, Grandaddy, and Femi Kuti, the book-like CD package features provocative essays from Noam Chomsky, Subcomandante Marcos, Arundhati Roy, and more, as well as photos of the effects of globalization and the grassroots struggle against it.

Something of an embodiment of globalization himself is Tonino Carotone, the Spanish-born Italophile who appears with folk-dub troubadour Manu Chao on Another World.Imagine a Latin-lothario Tom Waits and you start to get a bead on this rather strange bird. Taking a break from his latest recording project, Carotone answered a few questions via e-mail from his home in Madrid. (This interview is translated from Spanish.)

Outtakes:How has globalization affected Europe?

TC:We're living in a historic moment, especially because of all the immigration in Europe, which is a perfect example of how European globalization operates, recently unleashing a violent reaction from the latest generation of immigrants. These protests are due to the frustration and disillusionment caused by the failure of immigration politics — inequality and marginalization and, as always, the class warfare and the degradation of social conditions, most drastically affecting the most deprived.

How has it affected you directly?

For myself, it has a negative effect. With regard to our Latin identity, we're losing our customs and cultural values, always getting closer to the American model: the restrictions on hours of operation in the bars, prohibitions on smoking, the fortification of our borders, the forbidding of I.D. cards to certain groups, video surveillance, the loss of liberties, the boom in prisons, etc.

Can music help solve these problems?

Music generally helps to move things in a different direction. It's a good medicine, a kind of therapy that can actually become an instrument of battle. It's an important means of communication that can reach out to so many different places to transmit its message. Music is always positive. Jonathan Zwickel

Another World Is Possible is available at uncivilizedworld.com.

Dead Again

Springtime and desert glare aren't the ideal conditions for resurrecting the undead. Yet it was in April of this year at the Coachella Music Festival in Indio, California, that the four original members of Bauhaus found themselves back in black for the first time since 1998.

Suddenly, Bauhaus, contentedly moribund for the past two decades, was beset by offers to dust off its nihilism playbook and represent for the senior goths.

"Yes, that's exactly what happened," lead guitar player Daniel Ash says by phone from Ontario. "That's the whole reason we're doing this. We thought Coachella would be a one- or two-time 'resurrection,' but that went so well we were offered gigs out of the blue, and right there, at the festival, on the spur of the moment, we agreed and just sort of hit the road."

Ash makes light of what's come to officially be called the "Resurrection Tour," but Bauhaus baggage is heavy. An obvious influence on everyone from the Faint to Interpol, Bauhaus' life span was short — from 1979 to 1983 — and consisted of a meager four albums. Yet this limited oeuvre would go on to define two decades of goth.

"Our work is actually shockingly simple," Ash says. "And we haven't made any attempt to muck it up by modernizing our sets with loops, tracks, samples, dance mixes, or what have you."

In the years since, the four members have not let their inclinations atrophy. After a successful solo career, mercurial lead singer Peter Murphy converted to Islam and moved from his native England to Istanbul, Turkey. Ash, meanwhile, formed Love and Rockets with the remaining Bauhaus members and scored a hit with 1989's "So Alive."

But don't expect to hear anything non-Bauhaus during the current tour. "Those are other entities," Ash declares of the various side projects, "and Bauhaus is Bauhaus. We get back into character very easily. For this tour, we only rehearsed for about two weeks. We just listened to the old records and were easily able to reproduce the old feelings as well as the old sounds."

While the transformation was easy, the band isn't making any long-term commitments. "I don't know what's going to happen in two weeks, let alone looking ahead to new studio work or another tour," Ash says, "though I personally would like to see both of those things happen. But when you've got several very creative personalities... let's just say I've given up predicting what's ahead." Jean Carey

Bauhaus performs at 10 p.m. Saturday, November 26, at Club Cinema, 3251 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Tickets cost $37.50 and are available through ticketmaster.com.Theme Dreams

Dolly Partonis many things — singer, songwriter, storyteller, actress, regular on the late-night talk-show circuit, and, of course, proud parent of twin sweater puppies. She also happens to be the driving force behind one of the nation's most successful theme parks — Dollywood, a place known for family fun, down-home values, and roller coasters as curvaceous as dear Dolly herself. That got Outtakes thinking — if she can do it, why can't other celebs turn their attributes into attractions?

1
 
2
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Miami Concert Tickets

Concert Calendar

  • October
  • Sat
    25
  • Sun
    26
  • Mon
    27
  • Tue
    28
  • Wed
    29
  • Thu
    30
  • Fri
    31
Loading...