Show Me the Munny

Unpainted dolls stake their claim in local pop culture

Apparently, the art thing doesn't pay so well. And without commercial successes like, say, art toys, Johnson is doomed to poverty. For that reason, she fully supports designer toys and what they could mean for struggling artists. She's also pleased that 10 percent of proceeds from the Munny show will go to the Humane Society, as she's got her own Faktura dog rescue business.

Skot Olsen, a renowned painter from Lauderhill, has decided to make an obscure reference to the 1930s H.P. Lovecraft novella The Shadow Over Innsmouth.

In the story, people begin breeding with and gradually turning into fish. Olsen's doll is about 30 percent human salesman, 70 percent blue, scaly fish, and it will be holding a briefcase and wearing a nametag. Olsen expects that with all the science-fiction lovers who frequent Tate's, someone will get the reference.

By Bucky Lastard
By Bucky Lastard
By RYZART
By RYZART
Nova Southeastern law Professor Jim Levy goes crazy for Kaiju.
Nova Southeastern law Professor Jim Levy goes crazy for Kaiju.
Nova Southeastern law Professor Jim Levy goes crazy for Kaiju.
Nova Southeastern law Professor Jim Levy goes crazy for Kaiju.
Munny forefathers, Barom 1 and Tim Biskup's Zagoran (following image)
Munny forefathers, Barom 1 and Tim Biskup's Zagoran (following image)
A creepy sampling of Levy's extensive art toy collection
A creepy sampling of Levy's extensive art toy collection
Natalie Wood, in charge of "girl properties" for the Jazwares Inc. art department, used real fox hair on her Cos Play Kitty Munny.
Natalie Wood, in charge of "girl properties" for the Jazwares Inc. art department, used real fox hair on her Cos Play Kitty Munny.
Jazwares art directors Mike DeCamp and Joe Amaro have their minds on their Munnys and Munnys on their minds.
Jazwares art directors Mike DeCamp and Joe Amaro have their minds on their Munnys and Munnys on their minds.
Skot Olsen paints an obscure reference to H.P. Lovecraft's novella The Shadow Over Innsmouth.
Skot Olsen paints an obscure reference to H.P. Lovecraft's novella The Shadow Over Innsmouth.

Painting a plastic object is actually a first for Olsen, who has long rebelled against vinyl toys. "It seems like a lot more plastic crap choking up the planet," he says. He also doesn't respect a lot of what's coming out, believing the intention is no longer to create meaningful art but to make money. "A lot of great painters are jumping on the toy bandwagon and cashing in," he says. "They know this market will eat up all this stuff."

But hey, South Florida may be just the perfect receptacle for pseudo-inspired, plastic crap, he says.

"It's probably as good as any of the best places [for art toys] because it's mostly younger, trendy people with some disposable income that buys those things," Olsen says. "That makes up a big part of our population. And I think these toys go with the attitude of South Florida. Always changing. Always edgy. Plastic, trendy, and temporary."

Still, Olsen and many others have a soft spot for the Munny doll, and it's markedly difficult to condemn the synthetic creature. The Munny provokes creativity and has a way of uniting different sectors of the art community, a main reason that Magnetta chose a Munny show as her first.

Besides, they're just so damned cute.

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