Enlightened Eating

Frenching the Buddha at Ricky Gopeesingh's Nirvana

You'd have to have steel cojones, or some mixture of naiveté and optimism, to name your first restaurant Nirvana. You'd be setting the bar in the stratosphere and opening yourself up to some expensive, cutting jokes if you failed to deliver. The word nirvana has a lot of meanings, including "the end of suffering." I've never known anybody in the biz who claimed their suffering ended the day they opened their first restaurant. Au contraire: Let the toil and trouble begin!

Nirvana also refers to the extinction of desire. Or supreme contentment, ultimate self-knowledge. But it turns out the word resonated for chef-owner Ricky Gopee­singh in an entirely different register: He named his first restaurant after his baby daughter. Nirvana Gopeesingh has been gumming her Dad's curried chicken and homemade roti ever since.

Gopeesingh's 4-year-old place in Boynton Beach delivers on its name's implicit promise. Yet my desire is unextinguished. I'm not quite finished with my earthly adventure: I have a lot of eating still ahead of me, and I want to do a fair amount of it at this delightful restaurant. I desire its grilled prawns and crab cakes, curried squash soup, potato-plantain salad, and pan-roasted chicken. I desire to try the Caribbean snapper with coo-coo (that's Trinidadian patois for couscous) and tomato choka; I desire the lobster ravioli, which they were out of last time I dropped by. I desire to become a beloved customer so the hot waitresses can fawn over me on a regular basis. And from what I gathered from watching him lean his hunky forearms on the bar late one night as he tipped a glass, I desire to get to know this handsome, black-eyed chef — culinarily speaking — through many meals and many bottles of wine. Here's a guy who doesn't think vegetables and fruit are emasculating, a dude who knows how to use sweetness to balance fire. What a man.

Joe Rocco

Location Info

Map

Nirvana

1701 N. Congress Ave.
Boynton Beach, FL 33426

Category: Restaurant >

Region: Boynton Beach

Details

Nirvana, 1701 N. Congress Ave., Boynton Beach. Open for dinner 5 till 10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday in summer, daily in season. Call 561-752-1932.

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The 42-year-old Gopeesingh comes from Trinidad, where Indian and island cuisines merged in the 19th Century. The resulting fusion was probably the only lasting pleasant thing the British colonists inadvertently spawned (Indians imported to islands as indentured servants — bad. Man-zan curry chicken with cabbage slaw and plantains every Sunday since — good).

Gopeesingh has taken his native island's star turns — seafood, chutneys, and curries — and made them yet more wonderful and purely his own. He left Trinidad at 23 and worked his way through French, Italian, Southwestern, and Floribbean restaurants — he was sous chef at Pineapple Grille in Delray Beach before he opened his own place. Gopeesingh has been cooking since he was 10, and his particular way of seeing derives from his Buddhist background, his island heritage, and his classic French training whipped into a nostalgia for his mother's Hindu Indian-Caribbean vegetarian cooking. This heady, fruity brew is the basis for his menu.

Thus, you're not going to find anything else quite like Nirvana in these two counties. Drive down 441 in Lauderdale and you'll run across lots of Trinidadian roti shops, but none of those unleavened breads has the subtle, nutty sweetness of Gopeesingh's, and none is served with homemade green apple chutney and mango salsa on white tablecloths. We have our Indian eateries, and some are delicious, but not one would ever think to rub a juicy, rare rib-eye steak with garam masala and lob it onto a bed of mashed potatoes or to make a hollandaise sauce with ginger, lemongrass reduction, and orange juice to drizzle over a plate of Frenched lamb chops.

The conception of this food is romantic. The elegantly appointed tables, the lazy glow of a fish tank in the entry, work their seductive power. There's low lighting and pop-reggae on the sound system, a well-stocked wine bar. It's the kind of place you might want to take a date if you were really invested in not flubbing it. A leisurely, precise pace means you're not going to get rushed through dessert so they can shoehorn the next couple into your spot. These waitresses know how to set down a dish or replace used silverware. They love the menu too and are thrilled to detail it.

No wonder. Gopeesingh hasn't changed his lineup of appetizers and entrées much over four years: his signature homemade roti, livened with a pinch of sugar and given a bit of heft with baking powder, then grilled for a slightly crisp exterior, is made fresh daily in the late afternoon. Every table gets a plate of it with the green apple chutney and mango dipping sauce. Early favorites, like grilled prawns set over green salad in a basket made of toasted Parmesan ($8), haven't disappeared either, thank God. Three plump, lightly charred shrimp nest in a delicate green salad: You break the Parmesan basket into the greens as you eat down into it to make lacy, salty croutons.

Gopeesingh cools off a creamy, deep-orange curried squash soup ($6) by topping it with marinated cucumbers, tomatoes, and onions, effectively combining the soup and salad course. Sounds weird, but it works. A dollop of goat cheese draws out the sweetness in a crab cake wearing a coat of crisp plantain and a jaunty, sugared wonton hat ($8), inverted commas of creamy avocado and a pineapple compote setting it off like a memorable bon mot.

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