Start With a Nucho

In Guillermo Trujillo's paintings, there's magic at work, merging the land and the people who inhabit it

Stylistically, Trujillo appears to have adapted some of the techniques of pointillism and impressionism for his own uses. His pure landscapes, in particular, have been created through the accrual of countless tiny dots and daubs, while other images make extensive use of a sort of crosshatching.

This appropriation of such established techniques is, for Damian, "more about a modern approach to Panamanian traditions than a reinvention of the European." I'm not so sure. It could just as easily be seen as an acknowledgment that Panama, despite its own indigenous traditions, is also inextricably linked to the traditions of the Europeans who colonized it. Such a reading suggests that Trujillo is keenly aware of his country's convergence of cultural influences.

Wands turn into animals, people become like nuchos, and reality is entangled in imagination
Wands turn into animals, people become like nuchos, and reality is entangled in imagination

Details

"Guillermo Trujillo: Panamanian Master" On display through November 4 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Mizner Park, Boca Raton. Call 561392-2500.

However you want to interpret the art of this Panamanian master, there's no denying that his exotic, colorful world is irresistibly seductive and that our knowledge of Latin American art is enhanced by our exposure to it.

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