Lovey's Roti is a one-stop shop for West Indian eats, but here are a couple more interesting roti spots to check out:

Lucky City (5574 W. Sample Road in Margate; call 954-972-1880): Chinese food is huge in Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago, owing to a large influx of Asian workers who came to the two countries as indentured servants in the mid-1900s. Lucky City, tucked away off Sample Road in Margate, masquerades as a normal Chinese restaurant but includes a number of interesting Guyanese specialties. "Chicken in de ruff" is a Guyanese party food that's basically thickly breaded, bone-in fried chicken spiked with a sweet-and-sour tamarind sauce. Here, it's served over fried rice with plenty of shredded cabbage — a Guyanese friend of mine swears by the stuff. A typical West Indian menu with duck, chicken, goat, pork, and — yes — beef curry and roti is scrawled on a dry-erase board over the front register, which is often festooned with plastic containers full of Guyanese pastries such as flaky rolls filled with currants. The laid-back Caribbean vibe pervades to a fault, however. The restaurant's red booths and framed paintings of pastoral China look like they came with the place, and service is virtually nonexistent. When we asked for drinks, our waiter pointed toward a cooler near the back and told us to help ourselves. We did and ended up with mauby, a sweetened drink not unlike iced tea that's made with tree bark. You don't get much more authentic than that.

Aloo pie (this one from Lovey's) is a fried piece of bread sandwiched with potato, kuchela, and "peppa."
John Linn
Aloo pie (this one from Lovey's) is a fried piece of bread sandwiched with potato, kuchela, and "peppa."

The Curry Hut (5416 W. Atlantic Blvd. in Margate; call 954-972-9201): The Curry Hut is an authentic island eatery featuring made-to-order roti, an assortment of great curries, and some interesting Caribbean-influenced Chinese food. The place is more homely than homey, with packages of spices, dried goods, and incense on display at the brick countertop up front and hand-stitched napkin caddies dressing up each table. On weekends, the place gets raucous as live chutney, reggae, and reggaeton blare through the huge loudspeakers positioned in the corners of the restaurant. A cold Dragon Stout from Jamaica and a plate of cilantro-flecked conch curry goes great in that atmosphere, especially when the housemade, neon-orange Scotch bonnet sauce is used liberally. Also on Saturdays and Sundays, the Curry Hut serves bake and fish, a fried bread sandwich made with shark, salt fish, or smoked herring. Daily specials top out at $8, making it a cheap place to party like a Trinidadian.

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