The Many Colors of a City

Urban art and graffiti culture have always been debatable forms of expression. Well, at least to elitists and cops. Despite graffiti’s roots dating back to ancient Greece and further to the days of caves, it’s often compared to vandalism, which some say, has no place in the art world. But what makes graffiti so intriguing are its political motives and direct confrontations with the issues of city life, such as poverty and isolation. While the show at Studio 18 Friday may not be a graffiti show, its theme, “Urban Decay,” showcasing the work of Ruben Ubiera, is directly rooted in and communicates the senses of hopelessness and vibrancy sometimes associated with the philosophical underpinnings of graffiti. In Ubiera’s Mad World Handful, a human figure, topped with a house for a head, takes on the thinking man’s pose. But instead of a meditative posture, the figure appears dejected and lost. Lyrics from Tears for Fears’ “Mad World” graze the background, further conveying a sense of loneliness. Another work, painted across six skateboards, takes on a less melancholy tone, with bright pink hues celebrating the familiar charm of a convenience store in Dania. No cover. Find Studio 18 at 1101 Poinciana Drive in Pembroke Pines. Call 954-961-6067, or visit ppines.com/studio18.
Fri., Oct. 1, 2010

 
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