...
MORE

An internal error has occurred.

Best Of Winner

Best Museum in Broward

Museum of Art

Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show...
Best Of Winner

Best Museum in Broward

Museum of Art Readers' Choice: Museum of Art,

Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show on Earth," because of financial problems. Then came a seeming miracle: "Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes," which opened last August, accompanied by the announcement of a potential new savior for the museum. By the time Executive Director Irvin M. Lippman (MoA's third director in seven years) came on board in October, the papal show was well on its way to becoming the museum's most successful exhibition since 2001's "Palace of Gold & Light: Treasures from the Topkapi, Istanbul." Lippman, who turned around the Museum of Art in Cleveland, can't take credit for the Vatican show, but so far, he's providing a much-needed sense of stability. MoA has had a roller coaster of a history, with daring shows followed by duds and mediocrity. But it has several solid permanent collections, including the "CoBrA Collection," the "Contemporary Cuban Collection," and "European and American Modern and Contemporary Art from 1900 to the Present." The vast Williams Glackens collection got its own wing in 2001, when the museum got a $2.2 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion. And recent shows, including the ethereal "Enrique Martínez Celaya: The October Cycle, 2000-2002," are the most promising in a long time. Call MoA the Comeback Kid of Broward museums.
Best Of Winner

Best Museum in Palm Beach

Boca Raton Museum of Art

When the Boca Raton Museum of Art reopened in its spectacular new 44,000-square-foot facility in Mizner Park, it pulled out all the stops. The inaugural show was the sweeping retrospective "Picasso: Passion and Creation -- The Last Thirty Years," which raised a question: Could the museum sustain such a high...
Best Of Winner

Best Museum in Palm Beach

Boca Raton Museum of Art Readers' Choice: Norton Museum of Art

When the Boca Raton Museum of Art reopened in its spectacular new 44,000-square-foot facility in Mizner Park, it pulled out all the stops. The inaugural show was the sweeping retrospective "Picasso: Passion and Creation -- The Last Thirty Years," which raised a question: Could the museum sustain such a high level of quality? The answer, three years later, is a resounding "Yes!" The museum ended 2001 with "Arman: The Passage of Objects," a show as impressive as the Picasso. And under the stewardship of Executive Director George S. Bolge, formerly of Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art, the Boca Museum has continued to deliver. Along with the annual "All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition," there have been a pair of Chagall exhibitions, a show of recent work by Fort Lauderdale-based artist Matthew Carone, Richard Pousette-Dart and David Remfrey shows, and an ambitious exhibition showcasing ten contemporary Latin American artists. In the past year alone, Bolge and his diligent staff have continued their tradition of showcasing art from local private collections, as well as giving us "Frank Lloyd Wright: Windows of the Darwin D. Martin House" and the recent corporate show from the UBS Art Collection. As if all this weren't enough, the museum still maintains rotating selections from its extensive permanent collections in its second-floor galleries.
Article

Best Museum of Local African-American History

Located in the 1926 home of Delray Beach educator S.D. Spady, the museum is a tiny gem of cultural preservation. Runaway slaves seeking refuge from bounty hunters settled in Delray Beach around 1894. The museum features the history of two African-American communities that sprang up from the ground they settled:...
See more results