John Goodman Found Guilty of DUI Manslaughter and Vehicular Homicide

John Goodman Found Guilty of DUI Manslaughter and Vehicular Homicide

Polo mogul John Goodman has been found guilty.

After deliberating for a few hours on Tuesday, the six-member jury that was brought in from Tampa found the founder of the International Polo Club guilty of DUI manslaughter in the 2010 death of 23-year-old Scott Wilson.

In addition to manslaughter, Goodman was also found guilty of vehicular homicide.

See also: Alleged Jury Tampering in John Goodman Retrial Leads to Arrest

This was the second time Goodman stood trial for the death of Wilson.

Goodman had claimed that the brakes on his Bentley failed, and that he didn't get drunk until after the crash. After the accident, he left the scene.

Goodman was convicted two years ago, but the judge threw out the verdict and ordered a new trial, due to juror misconduct.

At the time of the accident that killed Wilson, Goodman's blood-alcohol level was recorded at .177, more than twice the legal limit.

Goodman had been sentenced to 16 years in prison two years ago after he got drunk, got in his car, and drove while intoxicated, ran a stop sign, then killed 23-year-old Scott Wilson when he crashed into him in 2010.

But in May 2013, his lawyers successfully got courts to grant Goodman a retrial after it was learned that one of the jurors apparently wrote a self-published book titled Will She Kiss Me or Kill Me? in which he wrote that his wife was once busted for DUI.

His attorneys also wanted to move the retrial out of Palm Beach, fearing the media attention might taint the jury.

The retrial was held in Palm Beach anyway, with a jury that was bussed in from Tampa.

We'll update this post as more information comes in

Send your story tips to the author, Chris Joseph. Follow Chris Joseph on Twitter

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