Palm Beach Man Calls Cops on Son After He Hacks Gator to Death

Palm Beach Man Calls Cops on Son After He Hacks Gator to Death

A 19-year-old Palm Beach Gardens man decided it would be a neat idea to kill an alligator by hacking it to death with a machete.

He then decided to share the moment with his dad, and so he texted his old man a photo of himself and the dead, hacked-up gator.

But instead of getting the "Attaboy!" he was probably expecting from his father, the teen got wildlife authorities called on him. By his father.

Corey Hardie got a visit from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission investigators last Friday after his dad called them up to report that his son had massacred an alligator with a machete.

Apart from being a cruel way to take out an animal, you need a special license to trap and kill alligators in Florida. That, or if, you know, one is trying to eat you.

Other than that, though, you can't just go walking around hacking alligators to death because you feel like it.

Corey's dad, Tim Hardie, told FWC officials that he received a photo from his son kneeling over the dead alligator. Corey had told him he found the gator at the north entrance of the J.W. Corbett Wildlife Management Area, several miles northwest of West Palm Beach.

After receiving the tip, FWC officials showed up at Corey's house and began questioning him about the photo.

At first, Corey blamed a buddy of his, saying it was his friend who killed the gator. But when authorities listened in on a phone call between the two later, they heard Corey apologize to his friend for pointing the finger at him. Corey also admitted in the phone call that it was he who killed the animal.

Corey Hardie was arrested and is facing charges of illegal killing of an alligator and killing or wounding a protected species. He was released from the Palm Beach County Jail on Saturday after posting a $6,000 bond.

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