Navigation

Block Heads

We know what you’re thinking: Legos as art. Yeah, right. If by art you mean sweet-ass minihelicopters or little Death Stars or any of the other bazillion structures or machines that Legos have built over the past 60 years, then, yes, Legos can be art. But aside from badass dinosaurs...
Share this:
We know what you’re thinking: Legos as art. Yeah, right. If by art you mean sweet-ass minihelicopters or little Death Stars or any of the other bazillion structures or machines that Legos have built over the past 60 years, then, yes, Legos can be art. But aside from badass dinosaurs and completely frickin’ amazing robots with souls, no one ever makes much out of Legos that could be thought of as, you know, alive. Enter Nathan Sawaya, whose large-scale, painstaking Lego sculptures focus on the human form in a way that will change your view of interlocking toy bricks. Forget the little swivel-headed vikings and pirates and Storm Troopers that you affix to various ships: Sawaya will render a life-sized, self-rending human torso, a replica Mount Rushmore, an oversized human heart, and yes, a rad-ass Tyrannosaur. We’re sure you’d pull the same wizardry if you had 1.5 million blocks in your studio too. But see this master at work at the opening reception of his ten-week exhibit “Replay” at the Art and Culture Center of Hollywood (1650 Harrison St., Hollywood). Admission runs $10 for adult nonmembers. Visit artandculturecenter.org, or call 954-921-3274.
Fri., June 4, 6 p.m.; Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.; Sundays, noon. Starts: June 4. Continues through Aug. 15, 2010
KEEP NEW TIMES FREE... Since we started New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of South Florida, and we'd like to keep it that way. Your membership allows us to continue offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food, and culture with no paywalls. You can support us by joining as a member for as little as $1.