She Dances on Hitler’s Grave

Being forced to hide your Jewish heritage, convert to Catholicism, and change your last name probably doesn’t sound funny to most people, but for Frannie Sheridan, the best way to deal with personal tragedy is to poke fun at it. After narrowly escaping the Holocaust and then a brutal, anti-Semitic attack, Sheridan’s Orthodox father changed the family name from Sigal and told them all to act like goyims. “Confessions of a Jewish Shiksa... Dancing on Hitler’s Grave” is Sheridan’s one-woman play about her family’s journey away from and back to their Jewish roots. Prancing barefoot around the stage in black leggings and an oversized red tie, Sheridan is no Anne Frank. But while Anne Frank’s tale, told with innocence and childish dignity, ends in tragedy, Sheridan’s is one of survival. Showtimes are 2 and 5 p.m. Sunday, October 17, and again the 24th and 31st at the Rose and Adolph Levis JCC’s Zinman Hall, 9801 Donna Klein Blvd., Boca Raton. For tickets, which cost $20, call 561-852-3241. For more information, visit franniesheridan.com.
Sun., Oct. 17, 2 & 5 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 24, 2 & 5 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 31, 2 & 5 p.m., 2010
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Rebecca McBane is the arts and culture/food editor for New Times Broward-Palm Beach. She began her journalism career at the Sun Sentinel's community newspaper offshoot, Forum Publishing Group, where she worked as the editorial assistant and wrote monthly features as well as the weekly library and literature column, "Shelf Life." After a brief stint bumming around London's East End (for no conceivable reason, according to her poor mother), she returned to real life and South Florida to start at New Times as the editorial assistant in 2009. A native Floridian, Rebecca avoids the sun and beach at all costs and can most often be found in a well-air-conditioned space with the glow of a laptop on her face.
Contact: Rebecca McBane