Take a Peek at These Peeps

With all the St. Patty's Day buzz in the air, it can be easy to forget there's another spring holiday hot on its heels. As with most holidays that have a religious background, there's plenty of secular fun to be had in regard to Easter. Perhaps no secular treat is more fun than the Peep -- not to eat. If you like marshmallow-like substance with crunchy dyed sugar coating the outside, good for you -- or maybe, good for your dentist. The real joy of the Peep is what you can do with it. There's always exploding them in the microwave, of course, but how about a fun diorama? The third-annual Peeps Show returns to the Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in downtown Lake Worth on Friday. Finally, an Easter activity everyone can enjoy -- even non-Christians and diabetics. Last year's dioramas ranged from the Black Eyed Peeps and Corn Bread to Peep Seeger, Little Bo Peep and Her Lambs, and a baby who Peeped in his pants. The opening party is from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday. Admission is free. The gallery is located at 605 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth. Hours are Sunday through Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Call 561-588-8344, or visit clayglassmetalstone.com.
Fri., March 15, 6-9 p.m., 2013
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Rebecca McBane is the arts and culture/food editor for New Times Broward-Palm Beach. She began her journalism career at the Sun Sentinel's community newspaper offshoot, Forum Publishing Group, where she worked as the editorial assistant and wrote monthly features as well as the weekly library and literature column, "Shelf Life." After a brief stint bumming around London's East End (for no conceivable reason, according to her poor mother), she returned to real life and South Florida to start at New Times as the editorial assistant in 2009. A native Floridian, Rebecca avoids the sun and beach at all costs and can most often be found in a well-air-conditioned space with the glow of a laptop on her face.
Contact: Rebecca McBane