The Afterlife Is Art

The ancient Chinese believed strongly in the afterlife, viewing death as a continuation of their present life. In their quest for eternity, the Chinese made many preparations, believing present-day behavior determined their reincarnation fate as either human or animal. Few elected the Buddhist death ritual of cremation, therefore leaving tombs and artifacts behind to be later discovered by current-day archaeologists. Unlock the secrets of this mummified world in the Norton Museum’s exhibition “Eternal China: Tales From the Crypt,” opening Saturday and running until July 17. The installation will reveal possessions left behind and explorations of notable tombs, giving insight into the mystical ways of the Chinese.

Admission is $12 for adults, $5 for visitors ages 13 to 21, and free for members and children under 13 at the Norton Museum of Art (1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach). Call 561-832-5196, or visit norton.org.
Tuesdays-Sundays. Starts: March 26. Continues through July 17, 2011

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Betsey Denberg