In 1985 Donald Trump bought this famous mansion on the Atlantic, added lots of gold plating, and turned it into a private club and spa for very special people. Sort of a bed-and-breakfast for the well-to-do. Mar-a-Lago is open to just about anybody who can pony up the $100,000 membership fee without jeopardizing the kids' college fund. If you are one of the few who can afford to join, membership has its privileges: a private beach, a nine-hole par-3 golf course, red clay tennis courts, a world-class spa, and the chance to hang out with celebrities. Known for his aversion to the ritual of the handshake, the Donald has no problem rubbing elbows with the rich and famous: Michael Jackson, Howie Dorough (of Backstreet Boys fame), and Charlton Heston are just some of the beautiful people who have dropped by the mansion for some R and R. Charity functions are also a good time for club members (and the occasional Trump family member) to mingle with Burt Reynolds, Mary Tyler Moore, Julio Iglesias, Tony Bennett, and Michael Douglas.
In 1985 Donald Trump bought this famous mansion on the Atlantic, added lots of gold plating, and turned it into a private club and spa for very special people. Sort of a bed-and-breakfast for the well-to-do. Mar-a-Lago is open to just about anybody who can pony up the $100,000 membership fee without jeopardizing the kids' college fund. If you are one of the few who can afford to join, membership has its privileges: a private beach, a nine-hole par-3 golf course, red clay tennis courts, a world-class spa, and the chance to hang out with celebrities. Known for his aversion to the ritual of the handshake, the Donald has no problem rubbing elbows with the rich and famous: Michael Jackson, Howie Dorough (of Backstreet Boys fame), and Charlton Heston are just some of the beautiful people who have dropped by the mansion for some R and R. Charity functions are also a good time for club members (and the occasional Trump family member) to mingle with Burt Reynolds, Mary Tyler Moore, Julio Iglesias, Tony Bennett, and Michael Douglas.
Before there was online dating, Betsey Chesler met her husband through a dating service. Now he's her ex-husband. "So, I know how not to match people," Chesler likes to say. When she decided to start her own online dating service, one of the only ones that also offers video dating online, she researched the field to find what the authorities -- psychologists, marriage counselors, divorce lawyers -- had to say about personality traits and compatibility. Then she developed a series of questions. On the face of it, these questions -- about religion, education, et cetera -- seem pretty basic. They're quick and easy to answer, except maybe the one that asks you to write an essay about your favorite subject -- you. But Chesler says it's what her custom-designed software allows her to do with the answers that makes the difference. Members are told not only with which other members they match up but how close a match -- percentagewise -- each one is.

Before there was online dating, Betsey Chesler met her husband through a dating service. Now he's her ex-husband. "So, I know how not to match people," Chesler likes to say. When she decided to start her own online dating service, one of the only ones that also offers video dating online, she researched the field to find what the authorities -- psychologists, marriage counselors, divorce lawyers -- had to say about personality traits and compatibility. Then she developed a series of questions. On the face of it, these questions -- about religion, education, et cetera -- seem pretty basic. They're quick and easy to answer, except maybe the one that asks you to write an essay about your favorite subject -- you. But Chesler says it's what her custom-designed software allows her to do with the answers that makes the difference. Members are told not only with which other members they match up but how close a match -- percentagewise -- each one is.

Best Place To See What's Left Of Broward's Undeveloped Coastline

John U. Lloyd Beach State Park

John U. Lloyd Beach State Park
Egad. Two hundred and fifty three acres of primo Broward coast with nary a condominium or strip mall in sight? Yep. John U. Lloyd unfurls its sands and native Florida flora and fauna between Dania Beach and Port Everglades with a narrow tidal waterway winding through the park's length. Rent a canoe and you can cruise through this creek's mangrove-fringed borders or watch an ibis pick its way through the eddies. Visiting the park's quiet southern end makes you want to lie down beneath a patch of pines and take a nap. The north end of the park offers a paved jetty where folks stroll, fish, and mull stuff over. A slatted wooden boardwalk leads toward the jetty, and the first (and only) bench at its foot offers a lateral view of the park's entire pristine stretch of coast. Weekends tend to get hectic, but midweek's the perfect time to take in the sweet sounds of nothing save the tide and an occasional gull.

Best Place To See What's Left Of Broward's Undeveloped Coastline

John U. Lloyd Beach State Park

Egad. Two hundred and fifty three acres of primo Broward coast with nary a condominium or strip mall in sight? Yep. John U. Lloyd unfurls its sands and native Florida flora and fauna between Dania Beach and Port Everglades with a narrow tidal waterway winding through the park's length. Rent a canoe and you can cruise through this creek's mangrove-fringed borders or watch an ibis pick its way through the eddies. Visiting the park's quiet southern end makes you want to lie down beneath a patch of pines and take a nap. The north end of the park offers a paved jetty where folks stroll, fish, and mull stuff over. A slatted wooden boardwalk leads toward the jetty, and the first (and only) bench at its foot offers a lateral view of the park's entire pristine stretch of coast. Weekends tend to get hectic, but midweek's the perfect time to take in the sweet sounds of nothing save the tide and an occasional gull.
Hollywood founder Joseph Young planned one part of this city right: You'd be hard-pressed to find a prettier place in all of Broward County to whiz by than this stretch. We despise those treacherous circles, but once you navigate your way through them, you reap the reward: four spacious lanes lined by 30-foot palm trees and stately pastel houses. There are no stores, no neon signs, no high rises, and usually no traffic. Put the top down on a breezy night, throw on some Frank Sinatra, breathe the slightly salty air, gawk at the million-dollar houses you could never afford -- especially the historic, canary yellow Young mansion the city is trying to buy -- and let the road sweep you to the beach like a grain of sand. On this road you won't even care if the bridge goes up.
Hollywood founder Joseph Young planned one part of this city right: You'd be hard-pressed to find a prettier place in all of Broward County to whiz by than this stretch. We despise those treacherous circles, but once you navigate your way through them, you reap the reward: four spacious lanes lined by 30-foot palm trees and stately pastel houses. There are no stores, no neon signs, no high rises, and usually no traffic. Put the top down on a breezy night, throw on some Frank Sinatra, breathe the slightly salty air, gawk at the million-dollar houses you could never afford -- especially the historic, canary yellow Young mansion the city is trying to buy -- and let the road sweep you to the beach like a grain of sand. On this road you won't even care if the bridge goes up.
Stranahan House
If you live here, you've heard this name many times, sometimes as the subject of political squabbles and usually as a place commanding the respect of history lovers. The politics seems typical: a developer wanted to put up a 38-story high-rise on the site of the market next door, and Stranahan House lovers fought the plan, taking it to the voters. They opted to buy the market themselves and turn it into a park in a March 2000 referendum, but we'll wait and see if this plays out well for the venerable house and its supporters. The history is unique: Frank and Ivy Stranahan's 1800-square-foot home, built in 1901, is the most famous Broward County landmark, the place where contemporary South Florida life began. You can see the solid, two-story Victorian structure with upper and lower porches and perfectly preserved interior rooms year-round. Seated on the New River, where Seminoles came to trade with the famously honest Stranahans, the house is open for tours Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m., and Sunday from 1 till 3 p.m.
If you live here, you've heard this name many times, sometimes as the subject of political squabbles and usually as a place commanding the respect of history lovers. The politics seems typical: a developer wanted to put up a 38-story high-rise on the site of the market next door, and Stranahan House lovers fought the plan, taking it to the voters. They opted to buy the market themselves and turn it into a park in a March 2000 referendum, but we'll wait and see if this plays out well for the venerable house and its supporters. The history is unique: Frank and Ivy Stranahan's 1800-square-foot home, built in 1901, is the most famous Broward County landmark, the place where contemporary South Florida life began. You can see the solid, two-story Victorian structure with upper and lower porches and perfectly preserved interior rooms year-round. Seated on the New River, where Seminoles came to trade with the famously honest Stranahans, the house is open for tours Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. till 3 p.m., and Sunday from 1 till 3 p.m.

Best Of Broward-Palm Beach®

Best Of