All the political, religious, and legal B.S. (and there sure is a lot of it) aside, 104.1 plays some of the tastiest nuggets of soul, funk, blues, and jazz that can be found on the radio anywhere, let alone this barren wasteland of airwaves ruled by Clear Channel and the FCC. Said to be broadcasting from North Miami, on a clear day the sounds of "the Boss" can be heard north of I-595 and as far west as Sawgrass Mills. One day, it played Miles Davis' Kind of Blue straight through, flipping the vinyl and everything for that authentic cracklin' and poppin' lo-fi experience. You'll hear P-Funk, Marvin Gaye, James Brown, and a plethora of obscure songs straight out of a rare-groove DJ's bag of tricks. It plays few (if any) commercials and broadcasts little inane DJ chatter, excepting the raves and rants of local legend Michael the Black Man. The Boss has no FCC license and borrowed the call letters of a Boston-based station, but it still plays music you just won't hear anywhere else.
All the political, religious, and legal B.S. (and there sure is a lot of it) aside, 104.1 plays some of the tastiest nuggets of soul, funk, blues, and jazz that can be found on the radio anywhere, let alone this barren wasteland of airwaves ruled by Clear Channel and the FCC. Said to be broadcasting from North Miami, on a clear day the sounds of "the Boss" can be heard north of I-595 and as far west as Sawgrass Mills. One day, it played Miles Davis' Kind of Blue straight through, flipping the vinyl and everything for that authentic cracklin' and poppin' lo-fi experience. You'll hear P-Funk, Marvin Gaye, James Brown, and a plethora of obscure songs straight out of a rare-groove DJ's bag of tricks. It plays few (if any) commercials and broadcasts little inane DJ chatter, excepting the raves and rants of local legend Michael the Black Man. The Boss has no FCC license and borrowed the call letters of a Boston-based station, but it still plays music you just won't hear anywhere else. Readers' Choice: WPYM-FM (93.1)

Best Radio Show

Sounds of the Caribbean

WLRN-FM (91.3) Sounds of the Caribbean has been a presence on South Florida's airwaves since 1979, when none other than Bob Marley convinced host Clint O'Neil that he could be an important voice of island culture in Miami, a city that could be called the capital of the Caribbean. Until recently, O'Neil's Monday-through-Friday, late-night broadcasts were supplemented with two weekend editions hosted by Kevin "Ital-K" Smith, but Smith's early Sunday and Monday morning shows were replaced with BBC News by station management in October. It's a shame Smith's quick wit and sharp British accent is no longer heard, but O'Neil is still on from 2 to 7 a.m. Sundays, laying down tracks from nearly every tropical genre, from soca to rocksteady and dancehall through Afro-Cuban. Through the Internet, the station reaches listeners worldwide. The show breaks up the canned chatter and carefully calculated playlists that rule the corporately controlled medium of radio today.

Once upon a time, theater was a crucible through which a society's deepest concerns were given life on-stage. That unquestionably was the case this season when a powerful tale of racial conflict and media manipulation, Permanent Collection, blazed white hot at Florida Stage. The staging was expert, combining a professional acting ensemble, assured direction, and superior production support. But it was this show's fierce emotional and intellectual honesty -- which set up many more questions than answers -- that made for such a memorable, challenging theatrical event.
Once upon a time, theater was a crucible through which a society's deepest concerns were given life on-stage. That unquestionably was the case this season when a powerful tale of racial conflict and media manipulation, Permanent Collection, blazed white hot at Florida Stage. The staging was expert, combining a professional acting ensemble, assured direction, and superior production support. But it was this show's fierce emotional and intellectual honesty -- which set up many more questions than answers -- that made for such a memorable, challenging theatrical event.
Working out of the tiny, bare-bones Sol Theatre, Hooker has managed to stage several strong productions in the past but nothing like this fierce, truthful portrait of lesbian love and courage. Hooker's rock 'em, sock 'em style doesn't fit every show he does, but with Stop Kiss, he found a fine match. Featuring a headlong pace and emotional detail, Hooker's staging made for memorable, high-impact theater that resonated long after the show was over.

Working out of the tiny, bare-bones Sol Theatre, Hooker has managed to stage several strong productions in the past but nothing like this fierce, truthful portrait of lesbian love and courage. Hooker's rock 'em, sock 'em style doesn't fit every show he does, but with Stop Kiss, he found a fine match. Featuring a headlong pace and emotional detail, Hooker's staging made for memorable, high-impact theater that resonated long after the show was over.

In a break from his usual job as producing artistic director of the Palm Beach Dramaworks, Hayes gave an exceptionally well-rendered performance as Norman, the fussy, devoted backstage dresser for a domineering actor. Using a thick Midlands accent and a tentative, repressed physicality, Hayes managed a complete transformation into Norman, whose quiet demeanor masked his wrenching heartbreak. Hayes is currently performing in No Exit, which runs through May 23.

In a break from his usual job as producing artistic director of the Palm Beach Dramaworks, Hayes gave an exceptionally well-rendered performance as Norman, the fussy, devoted backstage dresser for a domineering actor. Using a thick Midlands accent and a tentative, repressed physicality, Hayes managed a complete transformation into Norman, whose quiet demeanor masked his wrenching heartbreak. Hayes is currently performing in No Exit, which runs through May 23.

Clearwood's portrayal of a restless New Yorker who finds herself falling in love with another woman was a significant creative achievement and a highlight of the season. Clearwood not only delivered a totally grounded, honest performance but she had to do so within a mind-boggling, nonlinear narrative, alternating scenes before and after a horrible crime. In so doing, she managed to reveal a fully human heroine -- dazed, confused, hilarious, and heart-breaking.

Clearwood's portrayal of a restless New Yorker who finds herself falling in love with another woman was a significant creative achievement and a highlight of the season. Clearwood not only delivered a totally grounded, honest performance but she had to do so within a mind-boggling, nonlinear narrative, alternating scenes before and after a horrible crime. In so doing, she managed to reveal a fully human heroine -- dazed, confused, hilarious, and heart-breaking.

Best Of Broward-Palm Beach®

Best Of