Have you ever gotten a whiff of Nag Champa? It seeps into your clothes. It does strange things to you. It makes you want to turn on your black light, stare at your Pink Floyd poster, and just "be cool, man." It turns anxious Type A's into mellow love and peaceniks. Now, Afro-Cuban free-jazz groups aren't often known for a sense of humor, but this Fort Lauderdale band makes the dreaded dorm room incense (all right, now you know what we're talking about) sound clever, and that deserves a round of applause. Or, at least a "right on."

Have you ever gotten a whiff of Nag Champa? It seeps into your clothes. It does strange things to you. It makes you want to turn on your black light, stare at your Pink Floyd poster, and just "be cool, man." It turns anxious Type A's into mellow love and peaceniks. Now, Afro-Cuban free-jazz groups aren't often known for a sense of humor, but this Fort Lauderdale band makes the dreaded dorm room incense (all right, now you know what we're talking about) sound clever, and that deserves a round of applause. Or, at least a "right on."

Cheap 'n' dirty. That's the way we like our women, and that's the way we like our movie theaters. Here, there ain't no $8 popcorn, there ain't no $12 tickets, and there ain't no highfalutin "independent films" for no sissies. It's three bucks a person ($1 for children under 12) to get in, and y'all can sit just fine in the bed of your pickup truck or what have you. We always bring a blanket, and we like to bring a boom box, 'cause you gotta listen to the sound on the radio, and we don't like to drain the battery on the Ford, else Scooter's gotta come and give us a jump. Just the other night, I took Debbie to see Starsky & Hutch -- I'm tellin' ya, they show pretty new movies for three bucks! But I can't really say how good the movie was, 'cause it's a drive-in and all, and like I told ya, I like my women cheap 'n' dirty...
Cheap 'n' dirty. That's the way we like our women, and that's the way we like our movie theaters. Here, there ain't no $8 popcorn, there ain't no $12 tickets, and there ain't no highfalutin "independent films" for no sissies. It's three bucks a person ($1 for children under 12) to get in, and y'all can sit just fine in the bed of your pickup truck or what have you. We always bring a blanket, and we like to bring a boom box, 'cause you gotta listen to the sound on the radio, and we don't like to drain the battery on the Ford, else Scooter's gotta come and give us a jump. Just the other night, I took Debbie to see Starsky & Hutch -- I'm tellin' ya, they show pretty new movies for three bucks! But I can't really say how good the movie was, 'cause it's a drive-in and all, and like I told ya, I like my women cheap 'n' dirty... Readers' Choice: Muvico Theaters
Taking responsibility for Stickshift Lover is a quintet of crazies consisting of moonlighting members of Where Fear and Weapons Meet and The Agency. A sendup of cock-rock excess, SSL is like Spinal Tap meets Tenacious D, topped with mulletized fright wigs of ungodly proportions. With a 300-pound front man packed into spandex tights, plus smoke machines and dry ice out the wazoo, Stickshift Lover is truly a sight to behold. In case you missed their sole live appearance, at the Factory in December 2003, our condolences. If "How much cock will it take, baby, before you're satisfied? You took a shot in the back, then you took one in the eye, oh my!" isn't the most memorable line in rock 'n' roll history by now, it's only because "You've got bedroom eyes, but I want what's between your thi-i-i-i-ghs" got there first. Stickshift Lover collects every sexist cliché known to hair-metal, spreads it around on a Slip 'n' Slide, and dives in.
Taking responsibility for Stickshift Lover is a quintet of crazies consisting of moonlighting members of Where Fear and Weapons Meet and The Agency. A sendup of cock-rock excess, SSL is like Spinal Tap meets Tenacious D, topped with mulletized fright wigs of ungodly proportions. With a 300-pound front man packed into spandex tights, plus smoke machines and dry ice out the wazoo, Stickshift Lover is truly a sight to behold. In case you missed their sole live appearance, at the Factory in December 2003, our condolences. If "How much cock will it take, baby, before you're satisfied? You took a shot in the back, then you took one in the eye, oh my!" isn't the most memorable line in rock 'n' roll history by now, it's only because "You've got bedroom eyes, but I want what's between your thi-i-i-i-ghs" got there first. Stickshift Lover collects every sexist cliché known to hair-metal, spreads it around on a Slip 'n' Slide, and dives in.
No, you don't have to try the garlic ice cream if you don't feel like it. But for your own sake, put away your preconceptions. Toss your trepidation. Forget your aversion to the smelly subterranean substance. The lowly clove is enjoying a quiet renaissance -- led by nouvelle cuisine chefs, mostly, and those who praise its health benefits -- and we are so down, the fest has turned into one of Delray's biggest claims to fame. Now, South Florida's soils aren't at all compatible with the conditions favored by the old Stinking Rose, but that doesn't stop farmers from trucking in six-headed hybrids of the beloved bulb. Now in its sixth year, this unlikely combination of garlic and good times has expanded to a three-day blowout featuring live music, and hordes of folks so geeked-up over garlic, the Altoids people should seriously consider co-sponsorship. Garlic -- it's not just for vampires anymore.
No, you don't have to try the garlic ice cream if you don't feel like it. But for your own sake, put away your preconceptions. Toss your trepidation. Forget your aversion to the smelly subterranean substance. The lowly clove is enjoying a quiet renaissance -- led by nouvelle cuisine chefs, mostly, and those who praise its health benefits -- and we are so down, the fest has turned into one of Delray's biggest claims to fame. Now, South Florida's soils aren't at all compatible with the conditions favored by the old Stinking Rose, but that doesn't stop farmers from trucking in six-headed hybrids of the beloved bulb. Now in its sixth year, this unlikely combination of garlic and good times has expanded to a three-day blowout featuring live music, and hordes of folks so geeked-up over garlic, the Altoids people should seriously consider co-sponsorship. Garlic -- it's not just for vampires anymore. Readers' Choice: SunFest
Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale
Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show on Earth," because of financial problems. Then came a seeming miracle: "Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes," which opened last August, accompanied by the announcement of a potential new savior for the museum. By the time Executive Director Irvin M. Lippman (MoA's third director in seven years) came on board in October, the papal show was well on its way to becoming the museum's most successful exhibition since 2001's "Palace of Gold & Light: Treasures from the Topkapi, Istanbul." Lippman, who turned around the Museum of Art in Cleveland, can't take credit for the Vatican show, but so far, he's providing a much-needed sense of stability. MoA has had a roller coaster of a history, with daring shows followed by duds and mediocrity. But it has several solid permanent collections, including the "CoBrA Collection," the "Contemporary Cuban Collection," and "European and American Modern and Contemporary Art from 1900 to the Present." The vast Williams Glackens collection got its own wing in 2001, when the museum got a $2.2 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion. And recent shows, including the ethereal "Enrique Martínez Celaya: The October Cycle, 2000-2002," are the most promising in a long time. Call MoA the Comeback Kid of Broward museums. Readers' Choice: Museum of Art,

Fort Lauderdale

Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show on Earth," because of financial problems. Then came a seeming miracle: "Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes," which opened last August, accompanied by the announcement of a potential new savior for the museum. By the time Executive Director Irvin M. Lippman (MoA's third director in seven years) came on board in October, the papal show was well on its way to becoming the museum's most successful exhibition since 2001's "Palace of Gold & Light: Treasures from the Topkapi, Istanbul." Lippman, who turned around the Museum of Art in Cleveland, can't take credit for the Vatican show, but so far, he's providing a much-needed sense of stability. MoA has had a roller coaster of a history, with daring shows followed by duds and mediocrity. But it has several solid permanent collections, including the "CoBrA Collection," the "Contemporary Cuban Collection," and "European and American Modern and Contemporary Art from 1900 to the Present." The vast Williams Glackens collection got its own wing in 2001, when the museum got a $2.2 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion. And recent shows, including the ethereal "Enrique Martínez Celaya: The October Cycle, 2000-2002," are the most promising in a long time. Call MoA the Comeback Kid of Broward museums. Readers' Choice: Museum of Art,

Fort Lauderdale

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