No, you don't have to try the garlic ice cream if you don't feel like it. But for your own sake, put away your preconceptions. Toss your trepidation. Forget your aversion to the smelly subterranean substance. The lowly clove is enjoying a quiet renaissance -- led by nouvelle cuisine chefs, mostly, and those who praise its health benefits -- and we are so down, the fest has turned into one of Delray's biggest claims to fame. Now, South Florida's soils aren't at all compatible with the conditions favored by the old Stinking Rose, but that doesn't stop farmers from trucking in six-headed hybrids of the beloved bulb. Now in its sixth year, this unlikely combination of garlic and good times has expanded to a three-day blowout featuring live music, and hordes of folks so geeked-up over garlic, the Altoids people should seriously consider co-sponsorship. Garlic -- it's not just for vampires anymore.
No, you don't have to try the garlic ice cream if you don't feel like it. But for your own sake, put away your preconceptions. Toss your trepidation. Forget your aversion to the smelly subterranean substance. The lowly clove is enjoying a quiet renaissance -- led by nouvelle cuisine chefs, mostly, and those who praise its health benefits -- and we are so down, the fest has turned into one of Delray's biggest claims to fame. Now, South Florida's soils aren't at all compatible with the conditions favored by the old Stinking Rose, but that doesn't stop farmers from trucking in six-headed hybrids of the beloved bulb. Now in its sixth year, this unlikely combination of garlic and good times has expanded to a three-day blowout featuring live music, and hordes of folks so geeked-up over garlic, the Altoids people should seriously consider co-sponsorship. Garlic -- it's not just for vampires anymore. Readers' Choice: SunFest
Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale
Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show on Earth," because of financial problems. Then came a seeming miracle: "Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes," which opened last August, accompanied by the announcement of a potential new savior for the museum. By the time Executive Director Irvin M. Lippman (MoA's third director in seven years) came on board in October, the papal show was well on its way to becoming the museum's most successful exhibition since 2001's "Palace of Gold & Light: Treasures from the Topkapi, Istanbul." Lippman, who turned around the Museum of Art in Cleveland, can't take credit for the Vatican show, but so far, he's providing a much-needed sense of stability. MoA has had a roller coaster of a history, with daring shows followed by duds and mediocrity. But it has several solid permanent collections, including the "CoBrA Collection," the "Contemporary Cuban Collection," and "European and American Modern and Contemporary Art from 1900 to the Present." The vast Williams Glackens collection got its own wing in 2001, when the museum got a $2.2 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion. And recent shows, including the ethereal "Enrique Martínez Celaya: The October Cycle, 2000-2002," are the most promising in a long time. Call MoA the Comeback Kid of Broward museums. Readers' Choice: Museum of Art,

Fort Lauderdale

Only a year ago, Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art looked to be on the verge of collapse. Revenues were down dramatically, and key staffers came and went with alarming frequency. Two years earlier, the plug had been pulled at the last minute on a much-anticipated exhibition, "Fashion: The Greatest Show on Earth," because of financial problems. Then came a seeming miracle: "Saint Peter and the Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes," which opened last August, accompanied by the announcement of a potential new savior for the museum. By the time Executive Director Irvin M. Lippman (MoA's third director in seven years) came on board in October, the papal show was well on its way to becoming the museum's most successful exhibition since 2001's "Palace of Gold & Light: Treasures from the Topkapi, Istanbul." Lippman, who turned around the Museum of Art in Cleveland, can't take credit for the Vatican show, but so far, he's providing a much-needed sense of stability. MoA has had a roller coaster of a history, with daring shows followed by duds and mediocrity. But it has several solid permanent collections, including the "CoBrA Collection," the "Contemporary Cuban Collection," and "European and American Modern and Contemporary Art from 1900 to the Present." The vast Williams Glackens collection got its own wing in 2001, when the museum got a $2.2 million, 10,000-square-foot expansion. And recent shows, including the ethereal "Enrique Martínez Celaya: The October Cycle, 2000-2002," are the most promising in a long time. Call MoA the Comeback Kid of Broward museums. Readers' Choice: Museum of Art,

Fort Lauderdale

Boca Raton Museum of Art
Eduardo Chacon
When the Boca Raton Museum of Art reopened in its spectacular new 44,000-square-foot facility in Mizner Park, it pulled out all the stops. The inaugural show was the sweeping retrospective "Picasso: Passion and Creation -- The Last Thirty Years," which raised a question: Could the museum sustain such a high level of quality? The answer, three years later, is a resounding "Yes!" The museum ended 2001 with "Arman: The Passage of Objects," a show as impressive as the Picasso. And under the stewardship of Executive Director George S. Bolge, formerly of Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art, the Boca Museum has continued to deliver. Along with the annual "All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition," there have been a pair of Chagall exhibitions, a show of recent work by Fort Lauderdale-based artist Matthew Carone, Richard Pousette-Dart and David Remfrey shows, and an ambitious exhibition showcasing ten contemporary Latin American artists. In the past year alone, Bolge and his diligent staff have continued their tradition of showcasing art from local private collections, as well as giving us "Frank Lloyd Wright: Windows of the Darwin D. Martin House" and the recent corporate show from the UBS Art Collection. As if all this weren't enough, the museum still maintains rotating selections from its extensive permanent collections in its second-floor galleries. Readers' Choice: Norton Museum of Art
When the Boca Raton Museum of Art reopened in its spectacular new 44,000-square-foot facility in Mizner Park, it pulled out all the stops. The inaugural show was the sweeping retrospective "Picasso: Passion and Creation -- The Last Thirty Years," which raised a question: Could the museum sustain such a high level of quality? The answer, three years later, is a resounding "Yes!" The museum ended 2001 with "Arman: The Passage of Objects," a show as impressive as the Picasso. And under the stewardship of Executive Director George S. Bolge, formerly of Fort Lauderdale's Museum of Art, the Boca Museum has continued to deliver. Along with the annual "All Florida Juried Competition and Exhibition," there have been a pair of Chagall exhibitions, a show of recent work by Fort Lauderdale-based artist Matthew Carone, Richard Pousette-Dart and David Remfrey shows, and an ambitious exhibition showcasing ten contemporary Latin American artists. In the past year alone, Bolge and his diligent staff have continued their tradition of showcasing art from local private collections, as well as giving us "Frank Lloyd Wright: Windows of the Darwin D. Martin House" and the recent corporate show from the UBS Art Collection. As if all this weren't enough, the museum still maintains rotating selections from its extensive permanent collections in its second-floor galleries. Readers' Choice: Norton Museum of Art
After four years of moving about town to display its fascinating, unique cultural exhibits, the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History finally settled down in 2003 with a facility in Delray Beach. Established in 1999, the museum previously presented exhibits that explored the history of such varied topics as Third World cultures, fashion accessories, architecture, furnishings, toys, and just about any other cultural phenomenon with an interesting past. From lighthearted, multimedia exhibits like "The History of the Teddy Bear" to the more political "40 Years of the Barbie Doll" (in celebration of Women's History Month) to an earnest look at "The Removal of Indian Nations," the museum's wide range of subject matter makes for quite an enchanting afternoon -- one you'll not soon forget. A "Negro Baptismal" photography exhibit that opened in February runs through August 8. 2004 exhibits include "Lunchbox History" and "Creativity and Resistance: Marooned Cultures of the Americas." It's more than worth the $5 admission for adults and children over age 13.

After four years of moving about town to display its fascinating, unique cultural exhibits, the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History finally settled down in 2003 with a facility in Delray Beach. Established in 1999, the museum previously presented exhibits that explored the history of such varied topics as Third World cultures, fashion accessories, architecture, furnishings, toys, and just about any other cultural phenomenon with an interesting past. From lighthearted, multimedia exhibits like "The History of the Teddy Bear" to the more political "40 Years of the Barbie Doll" (in celebration of Women's History Month) to an earnest look at "The Removal of Indian Nations," the museum's wide range of subject matter makes for quite an enchanting afternoon -- one you'll not soon forget. A "Negro Baptismal" photography exhibit that opened in February runs through August 8. 2004 exhibits include "Lunchbox History" and "Creativity and Resistance: Marooned Cultures of the Americas." It's more than worth the $5 admission for adults and children over age 13.

Sports Immortals Showcase Museum and Memorabilia Mart
In 1864, the first pair of ice skates was patented in the United States. In 1920, Cleveland Indians shortstop Ray Chapman got beaned in the head by a Carl Mays fastball, becoming the first major league baseball player to die during a game. And in 1992, Andre Agassi won the Wimbledon Tennis Tournament. So how are all these historical sports tidbits related? Sports Immortals Museum and Memorabilia Mart, that's how. Anyone remotely interested in sports could spend hours gazing, mouth agape, at the huge collection of sports memorabilia, from Muhammad Ali's championship belt to Franco Harris' (autographed) cleats that gained him more than 100 yards in eight straight games. There's so much history stuff for the history buff that you won't know where to start; it'd be a good idea to take a guided tour. In addition to the more than 1 million (!) sports mementoes in a rotating display of 30,000 items, Sports Immortals features interactive games and theater. It holds fundraisers, auctions, parties, and field trips. And you can buy stuff too, for $2 to $10,000, such as signed lithographs (O.J. Simpson, $396, no bloodstains), and posters ('96 Stanley Cup, $68). Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children under age 12. Who says South Florida has no history?

In 1864, the first pair of ice skates was patented in the United States. In 1920, Cleveland Indians shortstop Ray Chapman got beaned in the head by a Carl Mays fastball, becoming the first major league baseball player to die during a game. And in 1992, Andre Agassi won the Wimbledon Tennis Tournament. So how are all these historical sports tidbits related? Sports Immortals Museum and Memorabilia Mart, that's how. Anyone remotely interested in sports could spend hours gazing, mouth agape, at the huge collection of sports memorabilia, from Muhammad Ali's championship belt to Franco Harris' (autographed) cleats that gained him more than 100 yards in eight straight games. There's so much history stuff for the history buff that you won't know where to start; it'd be a good idea to take a guided tour. In addition to the more than 1 million (!) sports mementoes in a rotating display of 30,000 items, Sports Immortals features interactive games and theater. It holds fundraisers, auctions, parties, and field trips. And you can buy stuff too, for $2 to $10,000, such as signed lithographs (O.J. Simpson, $396, no bloodstains), and posters ('96 Stanley Cup, $68). Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children under age 12. Who says South Florida has no history?

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