Forearms with tendons that resemble banyan roots, only they move. A cool and collected toughness that spells B-I-G T-I-M-E. Just 7 percent body fat on a musculature that is at once drop-jaw beautiful and downright frightening. Be afraid. Yes, be very afraid, because it's Preston Wilson, a young man simply dripping with uncanny talent and blockbuster potential. Last year as a rookie, he gave us just a hint of his incredible power and a fielding prowess that's gonna soon fill ESPN highlight reels. Move over Junior Griffey, there's a new daddy's boy in the league. Preston, who is former Met Mookie Wilson's stepson, definitely has a career. Now, the question is: Will it be with the Marlins?

They call him "Chop Chop," and not necessarily with admiration. In the blueblood circles of horseracing, Jorge Chavez has long been looked upon with a wary eye for his demonstrative (some would say brutal) use of the whip. But at four feet, ten inches -- tiny even by jockey standards -- Chavez leverages every ounce of his body into making his horses run. It may be ugly, but it's effective. At the ripe age of 39, the former Peruvian street urchin has found horseracing glory. Last year he rode two winners in the Breeders' Cup and was the top finisher during the Gulfstream season. Chavez capped off the year by winning the Eclipse Award for top rider in the country, besting such better-known Gulfstream stablemates as Pat Day and Jerry Bailey and permanently catapulting himself out of the ghetto of 30-to-1 long shots and claiming races. So for now, at least, make that Mr. Chop Chop.
They call him "Chop Chop," and not necessarily with admiration. In the blueblood circles of horseracing, Jorge Chavez has long been looked upon with a wary eye for his demonstrative (some would say brutal) use of the whip. But at four feet, ten inches -- tiny even by jockey standards -- Chavez leverages every ounce of his body into making his horses run. It may be ugly, but it's effective. At the ripe age of 39, the former Peruvian street urchin has found horseracing glory. Last year he rode two winners in the Breeders' Cup and was the top finisher during the Gulfstream season. Chavez capped off the year by winning the Eclipse Award for top rider in the country, besting such better-known Gulfstream stablemates as Pat Day and Jerry Bailey and permanently catapulting himself out of the ghetto of 30-to-1 long shots and claiming races. So for now, at least, make that Mr. Chop Chop.
If you're like us, you're repelled by the very idea of a bed-and-breakfast. Who in his right mind can relax in somebody else's house while surrounded at the breakfast table by a bunch of overfriendly yahoo tourists? Ugh. A friggin' Motel 6 sounds better than that. But the Banks of the Everglades is a different kind of bed-and-breakfast. You get to choose privacy by staying on the second floor, which has rooms that are fully furnished and have a private bath and kitchen. While the rooms are as fresh and clean as any Holiday Inn, the place is not a cookie-cutter corporate box; rather, it's wholly unique. With the look of an old-time courthouse, the building was constructed in 1923 by the late Barron Collier and served as the first bank in Everglades City. You can eat their delicious breakfast in the old bank vault or, if you find that a bit claustrophobic, outside on the porch facing a royal palm-lined street that is just a short walk from the Gulf. It's not too cheap and not too expensive -- we paid about $100 for our night in an efficiency that was cutesily dubbed "The Foreclosure Department." To get there, simply take the scenic drive through the Everglades on the old Tamiami Trail to Everglades City, which offers great fishing, a nice tour of the naturally gorgeous Ten Thousand Islands, good eats, and the kind of rich, quiet peacefulness you rarely get in Broward and Palm Beach.
If you're like us, you're repelled by the very idea of a bed-and-breakfast. Who in his right mind can relax in somebody else's house while surrounded at the breakfast table by a bunch of overfriendly yahoo tourists? Ugh. A friggin' Motel 6 sounds better than that. But the Banks of the Everglades is a different kind of bed-and-breakfast. You get to choose privacy by staying on the second floor, which has rooms that are fully furnished and have a private bath and kitchen. While the rooms are as fresh and clean as any Holiday Inn, the place is not a cookie-cutter corporate box; rather, it's wholly unique. With the look of an old-time courthouse, the building was constructed in 1923 by the late Barron Collier and served as the first bank in Everglades City. You can eat their delicious breakfast in the old bank vault or, if you find that a bit claustrophobic, outside on the porch facing a royal palm-lined street that is just a short walk from the Gulf. It's not too cheap and not too expensive -- we paid about $100 for our night in an efficiency that was cutesily dubbed "The Foreclosure Department." To get there, simply take the scenic drive through the Everglades on the old Tamiami Trail to Everglades City, which offers great fishing, a nice tour of the naturally gorgeous Ten Thousand Islands, good eats, and the kind of rich, quiet peacefulness you rarely get in Broward and Palm Beach.
When we pulled into port and took a turn to starboard, there it was: 16 floors of rest and respite from the seas. We had brought our 148-foot yacht (The Lucky Journalist) in from a winter tour of the Caribbean. Our captain, Raphael, thought it best to bring the ship to the mainland before hurricane season and give the crew of six a rest. As upscale boat owners, we booked ourselves into a poolside lanai room with a sultry, tropical feel that kept us from going into withdrawal. Just to keep ourselves feeling shipshape, we indulged in mud, massage, and haircut at the Spa LXVI. We then took on food supplies aplenty at the aptly named Mariner's Grille and imbibed some grog at the relaxing Pelican Bar. As the sun set, we climbed to the revolving bar that sits on top of the hotel. While the tourists gawked at cruise ships, we took pleasure in keeping a close eye on our yacht docked at the pier. Note to Raphael: Make sure to install more lights on board so all the bar patrons can be duly impressed with the rewards of journalism.

When we pulled into port and took a turn to starboard, there it was: 16 floors of rest and respite from the seas. We had brought our 148-foot yacht (The Lucky Journalist) in from a winter tour of the Caribbean. Our captain, Raphael, thought it best to bring the ship to the mainland before hurricane season and give the crew of six a rest. As upscale boat owners, we booked ourselves into a poolside lanai room with a sultry, tropical feel that kept us from going into withdrawal. Just to keep ourselves feeling shipshape, we indulged in mud, massage, and haircut at the Spa LXVI. We then took on food supplies aplenty at the aptly named Mariner's Grille and imbibed some grog at the relaxing Pelican Bar. As the sun set, we climbed to the revolving bar that sits on top of the hotel. While the tourists gawked at cruise ships, we took pleasure in keeping a close eye on our yacht docked at the pier. Note to Raphael: Make sure to install more lights on board so all the bar patrons can be duly impressed with the rewards of journalism.

Hibiscus House
There's something for everyone's taste and budget at Hibiscus House, built in 1922 and situated in the quaint historic Old Northwood section of West Palm Beach. There's the garden room with its four-poster bed and private terrace; the burgundy suite with its own private staircase that leads to an elegant sitting room with wet bar and an equally elegant bedroom. If you like to travel with others (another couple, or kids, or your mother-in-law), the 800-square-foot poolside bungalow has two bedrooms, two bathrooms, living room, dining room, and even a full kitchen, although, as with the other eight rooms, a full breakfast is included. And what a breakfast it is. Prepared by co-owner Raleigh Hill and served on bone china and in Waterford crystal, guests often don't have room for lunch after a Hill breakfast. At 6 p.m. complimentary wine, cocktails, and hors d'oeuvres are served poolside. The perfect place to discuss the stock market and where to go for dinner.

There's something for everyone's taste and budget at Hibiscus House, built in 1922 and situated in the quaint historic Old Northwood section of West Palm Beach. There's the garden room with its four-poster bed and private terrace; the burgundy suite with its own private staircase that leads to an elegant sitting room with wet bar and an equally elegant bedroom. If you like to travel with others (another couple, or kids, or your mother-in-law), the 800-square-foot poolside bungalow has two bedrooms, two bathrooms, living room, dining room, and even a full kitchen, although, as with the other eight rooms, a full breakfast is included. And what a breakfast it is. Prepared by co-owner Raleigh Hill and served on bone china and in Waterford crystal, guests often don't have room for lunch after a Hill breakfast. At 6 p.m. complimentary wine, cocktails, and hors d'oeuvres are served poolside. The perfect place to discuss the stock market and where to go for dinner.

In 1985 Donald Trump bought this famous mansion on the Atlantic, added lots of gold plating, and turned it into a private club and spa for very special people. Sort of a bed-and-breakfast for the well-to-do. Mar-a-Lago is open to just about anybody who can pony up the $100,000 membership fee without jeopardizing the kids' college fund. If you are one of the few who can afford to join, membership has its privileges: a private beach, a nine-hole par-3 golf course, red clay tennis courts, a world-class spa, and the chance to hang out with celebrities. Known for his aversion to the ritual of the handshake, the Donald has no problem rubbing elbows with the rich and famous: Michael Jackson, Howie Dorough (of Backstreet Boys fame), and Charlton Heston are just some of the beautiful people who have dropped by the mansion for some R and R. Charity functions are also a good time for club members (and the occasional Trump family member) to mingle with Burt Reynolds, Mary Tyler Moore, Julio Iglesias, Tony Bennett, and Michael Douglas.

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