Lists

Ten Songs That Prove Chiptune Is Worth Listening to

By Derek Heid

I have to admit, chiptune is something I've only been really into for a very short while. That's not to say I haven't been familiar with it. I knew people still made 8-bit music using old consoles, with special cartridges and modifications, and it pretty much sounded like music from an old NES game. It was cool, and fun for a bit, but the novelty wore off. That was what I thought I knew. But boy, was I wrong.

I recently decided to get deep into this genre and see what it had to offer, after becoming a fan of the The Pound Cast podcast by DJ Douggpound, AKA Doug Lissenhop, editor and writer for many shows including Tim and Eric's Great Job! . His guest on the episode in question was Anamanaguchi, a New York based chiptune band fresh off a performance on Jimmy Fallon.

Now, Anamanaguchi is probably the most well known of all 8-bit acts, thanks to having scored the popular Scott Pilgrim vs. the World video game, not to mention the use of the group's songs on TV and various podcasts. The band members got to talking about the chiptune scene, and how it's a relatively small one and while discussing places to find music, they dropped this gem of knowledge into my lap: 8bitpeoples.com, and I've been hooked ever since.

The term chiptune itself just refers to how the music's made, that a console or emulators of a console are used in the production, so the range of styles is extremely varied, and if I may say, surprisingly great most of the time. Enough talk, it's list time. Here are ten songs that should prove to everyone and anyone, chiptune should be taken seriously.

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Derek Heid