Broward News

Another BSO Deputy Busted in Extortion Case

Fausto Tejero, a 40-year-old Broward Sheriff's Office deputy has been charged in connection with the extortion case of Det. Manuel Silva. From the BSO release:

On September 30th, a citizen told a BSO supervisor that a district detective was extorting money from a man living near Fort Lauderdale. The victim, Orlando Gutierrez, gave a statement to BSO Internal Affairs detectives, detailing an encounter he had with Detective Manuel Silva on Tuesday, 9/29/09. The victim said Silva came to his home in plainclothes, but displaying a badge and gun. At Silva's insistence, Gutierrez gave consent to a search of his home. Silva entered and found five marijuana plants growing inside the house.

Silva told Gutierrez that he would not arrest him and seize his pot plants in return for cash. Silva also promised to tell Gutierrez who had tipped him off about the drugs in his house. Deputy Tejero was also at the house, in uniform and driving a marked BSO patrol car, acting as backup for Silva. Through their investigation, BSO Internal Affairs detectives determined that Tejero knew that Silva was extorting money from Gutierrez.

"I repeat that we will leave no stone unturned when there's evidence that a BSO employee has committed a crime," Sheriff Al Lamberti said. "Unethical or unlawful conduct will not be tolerated on my watch."

Tejero has been suspended without pay and is being held without bond in the Broward County Jail.



The investigation is continuing and any other victims are encouraged to come forward. Anyone with information can call BSO Internal Affairs at 954-321-1100.

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Thomas Francis