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Florida Doctor Made Patient Get Naked On All Fours As He Handcuffed Her, and Beat Her

A Lake Worth osteopathic doctor apparently treated a depressed female patient by making her get naked, and getting on all fours as he handcuffed her, blindfolded her, and then beat her with a whip.

He admitted to doing this during after hours (because..... of course!).

The 38-year old patient also alleges that she would be forced to perform sex acts on the good doctor as a "thank you" for the treatment.

And now, the Florida Board of Osteopathic Medicine is considering revoking his license.

Crazy enough, arguably the most screwed up part of all that information above is that they're considering it. As in, there's a chance this dude can get away with it.

Dr. David Simon admitted to the unusual treatment, saying that it was "punishment therapy" for his then 38-year old patient, according to his attorney.

Some would call it performing a BDSM sex act on a vulnerable patient, but tomato-tomahtoe.

According to the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office, the woman alleges that she would have to come in at least once a month for a year to receive Dr. Simon's therapy, which also included being choked, tied up and stuffed into a closet for several hours.

She told detectives that "she didn't like it," but went along with the sessions anyway.

Shockingly enough, this isn't the first time Dr. Simon was accused of being a creepy asshole.

According to WPBF 25 News, Simon was accused of sexual harassment in 2010 by a 24-year-old female patient after he allegedly rubbed her back and buttocks after a gynecological exam.

His then-victime alleged that Simon told her, "I think you need to be punished for being a bad girl. It seems you really need to be punished."

Dr. Simon has apparently apologized to the board for this recent incident:

"He's deeply embarrassed," said Simon's attorney, David Spicer. "This was a consensual relationship with an adult woman. However, the Board of Health is clear that doctors can't have a sexual relationship with a patient. That's why we worked out the settlement."

Dr. Simon's lawyer also says that a settlement of two years of probation and a $10,000 fine has been reached. However, the board is saying the charges made by the patient are a little more serious to have it just swept under the rug with a tepid settlement.

And, yea, a doctor shouldn't be having sexual relations with their patients. Also, they shouldn't be using them to get off on their fetishes and then calling it "therapy."

Send your story tips to the author, Chris Joseph. Follow Chris Joseph on Twitter



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