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| Crime |

Francisco Rojas Tells Cops He Can Pull His Own Tooth Out With Pliers and Vomit All Over His Garage Because He's "F***ing Drunk"

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Police say they went to Francisco Rojas' house in Port St. Lucie on Sunday after his wife called 911 saying her husband was drunk in the garage trying to pull a tooth out of his mouth with pliers.

Apparently, Rojas, 49, didn't like the fact that the cops interrupted him while he was drunkenly attempting to pull his tooth out in his vomit-covered garage.

"This is my fucking house, I can say and do whatever the fuck I want," Rojas said, according to a probable-cause affidavit. "I'm fucking drunk and you can't do nothing about it."

Well, the cops did do something about it -- starting by opening the garage door, which reeked of the vomit Rojas had barfed onto the floor.

After swearing at the cops a bit, Rojas was asked by one of the two officers on the scene to calm down and lower his voice, the report says.

Police say Rojas then turned to the other cop and started shouting and swearing at him instead.

By this time, the neighborhood children were gathering outside the house to watch Rojas scream at the cops, according to the report.

Police warned Rojas that the children outside could hear and see him and told him that he'd be arrested for breaching the peace if he didn't stop, the report says.

Instead, the cops say Rojas told them, "Fuck you, Mr. King. Take me to fucking jail," despite neither of the officers having that last name.

"Based on Francisco's behavior," he was taken to the St. Lucie County Jail, the report says.


Follow The Pulp on Facebook and on Twitter: @ThePulpBPB. Follow Matthew Hendley on Facebook and on Twitter: @MatthewHendley.


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