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George Zimmerman's Girlfriend Wants His Charges Dropped

Oh, look at this. George Zimmerman is going get away with an alleged crime again.

Again.

Again.

Zimmerman was busted last month for an alleged domestic disturbance with his girlfriend, Samantha Scheibe.

According to some 911 audio, Scheibe had the Seminole County Sheriff's Office come to her home and arrest Zimmerman after he allegedly pushed her and shoved a gun in her face.

But now, Scheibe is saying she wants the charges dropped and even signed an affidavit for it.

But prosecutors are saying not so fast.

See also: George Zimmerman Called 911 to Tell His Side of the Domestic Dispute With Girlfriend

Prosecutors are saying they could still pursue a legal case against Zimmerman, even with Scheibe dropping the charges. It's not unprecedented.

Zimmerman was charged with aggravated assault, battery, and criminal mischief after his arrest in November.

According to an email from State Attorney's Office spokeswoman Lynne Bumpus Hooper, there has been many a time when prosecutors went after a domestic abuse case even without cooperation from the victim.

Zimmerman had asked a judge to change the terms of his bond, so he can have contact with Scheibe.

In her 911 call during the altercation, Scheibe can be heard telling Zimmerman, "You put your gun in my freaking face and told me to get the fuck out!"

As the call continued and the dispatcher tried to get information from her, Scheibe is again heard talking to Zimmerman, saying, "Do not push me out of my house." She then tells the operator that "[Zimmerman] just pushed me out of my house and locked me out."

As the 911 operator gets more information, Scheibe tells her that, "[Zimmerman] knows how to do this. He knows how to play this game."

He certainly does.

Scheibe's tune has suddenly changed. She writes in the affidavit that the detectives interpreted the whole incident wrong.

"I am not afraid of George in any manner and I want to be with him," Scheibe wrote in the affidavit.

She also claims she was not coerced into signing the document.

Prosecutors can still pursue a case if they have enough evidence, such as the 911 call audio, police reports, physical evidence, witnesses, and defendant statements.

Of course, Scheibe can make things difficult if she insists on not cooperating, which is her right.

Either way, it looks like Zimmerman is once again going to just miss spending any real time behind bars. Whew!

Send your story tips to the author, Chris Joseph. Follow Chris Joseph on Twitter



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