Broward News

Police: 12-Year-Old Brings Gun to Charter School of Boynton Beach; Belligerent Teacher Arrested

The Charter School of Boynton Beach was locked down this morning after a 12-year-old student was arrested on weapons charges for allegedly bringing a gun to school. He said he found a gun and "brought it to school to scare another student who he was having a disagreement with," according to Boynton Beach Police.


But the student wasn't the only one arrested -- a teacher was arrested for allegedly fighting with the school principal and later police when his students weren't allowed to go to the bathroom during the lockdown.


Police say 55-year-old Mark Kleiman, of Cooper City, violated the lockdown procedure when he unlocked and opened his classroom door and "refused to listen to the Headmaster when he was explaining that the classroom needed to remain secure," according to the arrest report.

Kleiman said students needed to use the bathroom; the principal said too bad, according to the report. Kleiman got the same response when he asked a police supervisor if students could go to the bathroom.

"Again Kleiman refused to comply and was asked by the Headmaster to step out of the classroom where he was replaced by another member of the faculty who secured the classroom," wrote Boynton Beach Sgt. Hap Crowell.

Kleiman continued to make a scene and was warned three times that he would be arrested if he didn't quit it, according to police. But he didn't quit it, and now he's in Palm Beach County Jail charged with obstructing a law enforcement officer.

There is almost certainly more to the story than this; the school houses students in kindergarten through eighth grade; it's not clear how old Kleiman's students were or why it was so vital some of them get to the bathroom. More, probably, to come.



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Rich Abdill