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Rick Scott "Gets to Work" by Playing "DJ Govvy Gov" (Video)

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Gov. Rick Scott may not think Florida needs more anthropologists, but cruise-ship DJs -- that's a different story.

The governor held another one of his borrowed "Let's Get to Work" days this Friday at the Port of Miami, and among his duties, the governor's office said Scott planned to "demonstrate his commitment to exemplary customer service on Carnival Cruise Lines' Imagination."

Somehow, that turned into the governor manning the turntables and getting his groove on.

Of course, there's video:

This was the governor's fifth time spending a day out playing middle class, and of course, all that jammin' relates to job creation.

Here's what the governor's office had to say about the governor's day at the port:

To highlight the importance of international trade to Florida's economy, Governor Scott will spend the morning preparing heavy equipment for export later in the day to Panama, as well as inspecting oversized cargo destined for export and extremely time-sensitive import cargoes.

"Working at the Port of Miami today convinces me all the more that Florida is the best place for companies to import and export their products," Governor Scott said. "That is exactly why we must make sure our ports are able to compete with other ports in the Southeast and along the entire Eastern seaboard."

Governor Scott's workday began at 7 a.m. today with Seaboard Marine. The company provides direct, regular cargo transport service between the United States and the Caribbean Basin, Central and South America.

Later this afternoon, Governor Scott will demonstrate his commitment to exemplary customer service on Carnival Cruise Lines' Imagination. He will join employees providing a warm welcome to guests as they arrive and check in for a fun-filled, three-day cruise to the Bahamas. As a welcome host, onboard announcer and "Just Ask" host, he will provide guests information about the ship and the cruise.

The Port of Miami was chosen for Governor Scott's fifth 'Let's Get to Work' Day to highlight the importance of Florida's 14 deepwater seaports to job creation. The maritime cargo activities at Florida ports are responsible for generating more than 550,000 direct and indirect jobs and $66 billion in total economic value. Overall, the cruise industry is responsible for more than 115,000 jobs in Florida.

Apparently rhythm is not a job creator.


Follow The Pulp on Facebook and on Twitter: @ThePulpBPB. Follow Matthew Hendley on Facebook and on Twitter: @MatthewHendley.


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