Broward News

Ten and a Half Important People Paid Less Than Palm Beach County Superintendent Wayne Gent

​The Palm Beach County School District approved a $225,000-a-year contract for Superintendent Wayne Gent last week. Gent was named interim superintendent last year after parents booted Art Johnson from the spot; now he's got the permanent gig. Oh -- and another $66,000-per-year pension that he gets for retiring in 2010, then getting rehired for the same job a month later. Totaling somewhere around $291,000, that's a pretty sweet paycheck double-dip.

Exactly how sweet is it? With people on television arguing over billions and trillions, it can be hard to keep a quarter-mil here and there in perspective; here's a list of people who make less than the guy who runs Palm Beach County Schools:

Six and a half Floridian households combined
Census numbers from not too long ago put Florida's median household income at just under $45,000, which means Gent earns a little more than six times the average household. We have to be competitive, though! The big money will draw the big names. And we've got the cash -- oh... they're $50 million in the hole?

More than two Rick Scotts
Yes, Gov. Rick Scott is technically taking only a penny-per-year salary, but he's entitled to about $130,000 a year -- way less than Gent is getting paid to run a school district in one small corner of the state.

Any congressman
The annual salary for members of Congress is $174,000, but pay is higher for the congressional leaders ($193,400) and speaker of the House ($223,500). Gent has them all beat, even without his pension.

The U.S. Secretary of Education
Arne Duncan's salary (as of 2010) was $196,700 -- though that does come with all the glory of being an adviser to the first Kenyan president while Gent is stuck down here with an extra 95 grand. And a free take-home car.


New Times on Facebook | Twitter 
The Pulp on Facebook | Twitter 
Rich Abdill on Facebook | Twitter | Email

KEEP NEW TIMES BROWARD-PALM BEACH FREE... Since we started New Times Broward-Palm Beach, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of South Florida, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Rich Abdill