Sports

University of Miami Mourns Footballer Jojo Nicolas on Twitter

The University of Miami community was saddened to hear that former football player Jojo Nicolas died around 5 p.m. Wednesday after a horrific crash involving a semi-trailer truck on the MacArthur Causeway Tuesday. Fans, students, and Nicolas' former teammates took to Twitter to send their prayers and communicate their grief.

A social media trail shows that Nicolas and his brother Abner Davis had been pre-celebrating Nicolas' 25th birthday (on March 3) at Mansion Nightclub in South Beach. Before the crash, Davis' Twitter was filled with anticipatory statements of your typical club night, and after the crash, he was heartbroken.

See also: Ex-UM Star JoJo Nicolas Had Been Partying at Mansion Before Horrific MacArthur Crash UPDATED

KEEP NEW TIMES BROWARD-PALM BEACH FREE... Since we started New Times Broward-Palm Beach, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of South Florida, and we'd like to keep it that way. With local media under siege, it's more important than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" program, allowing us to keep offering readers access to our incisive coverage of local news, food and culture with no paywalls.
Jess Swanson is a staff writer at New Times. Born and raised in Miami, she graduated from the University of Miami’s School of Communication and wrote briefly for the student newspaper until realizing her true calling: pissing off fraternity brothers by reporting about their parties on her crime blog. Especially gifted in jumping rope and solving Rubik’s cubes, she also holds the title for longest stint as an unpaid intern in New Times history. She left the Magic City for New York to earn her master’s degree from Columbia University School of Journalism, where she spent a year profiling circumcised men who were trying to regrow their foreskins for a story that ultimately won the John Horgan Award for Critical Science Journalism. Terrified by pizza rats and arctic temperatures, she quickly returned to her natural habitat.
Contact: Jess Swanson