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Anderson Cooper's Weird Eating Habits

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Anderson Cooper isn't afraid of walking into a war zone, but he is afraid of most things us normal people put into our mouths -- namely, coffee and spinach.

A few days ago, Cooper revealed his dislike for "fancy" food combos like honey and peanut butter (really) to show guest Jerry Seinfeld. He then told Seinfeld that he didn't get waffles (pancakes are fine with Cooper, while Seinfeld presented Cooper with the texture defense for waffles -- while pancakes are flat, waffles have all those geometric angles that make eating more interesting).

Apparently, Cooper is one of those people who eats only to live (what fun is that?). He shared his typical meals, and we've gotta say, they're as palatable as wallpaper paste -- Boston Market dry turkey and corn, turkey burger plain with cheese, and egg whites.

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Today, in an effort to be bold and daring, Cooper tried some foods he's never had before. Some of you might guess those little see-through eels, scorpion on a stick, or possibly a rare fruit -- like jackfruit or durian. Close... for the first time, 43-year-old Anderson Cooper tried... coffee and spinach!

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We know, it boggles the mind. At least he's open to new ideas. And who knows? It might lead to something truly adventurous -- like a taco!


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