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Burger King Launches the Impossible Croissan'wich

The Impossible Croissan'wich
The Impossible Croissan'wich
Burger King

Nine months ago, Burger King made headlines by announcing its Impossible Whopper.

The sandwich, featuring a meat-free Impossible patty, was at first seen as an April Fool's prank, but the reaction to the plant-based Whopper was so positive the Miami-based fast-food giant fast-tracked its test run at locations in St. Louis, Missouri, and launched the Impossible Whopper in a number of cities — including Miami — six weeks later.

The Impossible Whopper's sales were so positive that Impossible Foods, the maker of the meatless patty, raised $300 million in capital to fund the demand for more product.

Now Burger King is trying to re-create that magic for breakfast.

The chain has announced the test run of the Impossible Croissan'wich, featuring an Impossible sausage patty. BK is quick to point out the Impossible version is not vegan-friendly: It's made with a toasted croissant made with butter, eggs, and cheese. That makes the sandwich a good alternative for people who don't eat pork, adhere to an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet, or simply want to eat less meat.

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The company is also likely trying to ensure that vegans know there are animal-based products in its new offering. This past November, Burger King was hit with a class action lawsuit by vegans who claimed their Impossible Whoppers were "contaminated" because they shared a grill with meat products. Burger King's website states the Impossible Whopper, served with nonvegan mayonnaise, can be made as a meat-free version upon request, which requires the patty to be prepared using a nonbroiler method.

Burger King will begin selling the Impossible Croissan'wich in participating restaurants in Savannah, Georgia; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Montgomery, Alabama; Lansing, Michigan; and Springfield, Illinois, at the end of January. No word yet on whether the sandwich will be available in South Florida.

The announcement of the special Croissan'wich comes just days after Impossible Foods announced it now makes meatless pork and sausage substitutes. The Impossible versions are said to contain fewer calories and less saturated fat than regular pork. They're also gluten-free and designed to meet kosher and halal standards.

Though it seems South Florida got the short straw when it comes to trying the new breakfast sandwich, the Impossible Whopper was available in Miami mere weeks after the St. Louis test run. That means South Floridians might be chomping on Impossible Croissan'wiches in no time. 

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