Food News

Market 17 Unleashes Smaller Menu for Smaller Wallets

Market 17, the farm-to-table restaurant located on 17th Street in Fort Lauderdale, released a new summer menu concept this past weekend. The goal is to make the Market 17 dining experience more accessible for locals over the summer months.

Executive Chef Lauren DeShields says: "We're looking to do smaller plate with lower prices."


The change comes in the form of a new snack menu. As with the rest of the year, the menu will change according to seasonal availability. Friday was the first dinner service to display the change. The menu included items such as pan-fried farm egg, crispy Brussels sprouts, with bacon

gastrique; skin chips, ducks and pork chicharones; snapper and pompano ceviche with apple, jalapeño, and pickled red onion, in citrus marinade; and warm, marinated olives confit of garlic, orange zest, and rosemary. The dishes cost $6 to $14. According to managing partner Kirsta Grauberger, the restaurant "will be adding some more things over the weekend. Right now, we're tweaking it."


The house-made charcuterie will also change from set boards to à la carte. Guests will have the option of three, five, or seven selections of meats and cheeses. Friday's menu offered French garlic sausage, andouille sausage, duck prosciutto, spiced ham, and chicken liver mousse.

The rest of the menu will stay close to the same but will reflect lower summer price points. Grauberger said, "We want to lighten the menu, lighten the pocket, and make Market 17 more accessible for those who would like to come but cannot always afford it." As always, Market 17 offers half-priced happy hour from 5 to 7 p.m. 

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Sara Ventiera