First Look

Rice Paradise: New Gluten-Free Rice Pudding and Cake Shop Opens in Hallandale Beach

Gluten and desserts have always seemed to go hand in hand, leaving the gluten-intolerant and those battling Celiac disease with little to combat sugar cravings. Twenty-four year old Szandra Szeghalmi has found a gluten-free loophole: rice pudding and cakes. Using her Hungarian grandmother's recipes, Szeghalmi brings Hallandale Beach a shop, Rice Paradise, where people can finally rejoice and munch on the tasty rice-based sweets regardless of their tolerance to gluten.

While, the concept is unconventional in the states, Szeghalmi has been pleased with the feedback she's received since opening last week. She hopes to open more locations and franchise stores to make Rice Paradise's rice cakes and puddings as ubiquitous as McDonald's golden arches -- albeit with a lot less gluten and trans fats.

See also: Gluten Intolerant Chef Launches Weezie's Gluten-Free Bakery in Fort Lauderdale

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Jess Swanson is a staff writer at New Times. Born and raised in Miami, she graduated from the University of Miami’s School of Communication and wrote briefly for the student newspaper until realizing her true calling: pissing off fraternity brothers by reporting about their parties on her crime blog. Especially gifted in jumping rope and solving Rubik’s cubes, she also holds the title for longest stint as an unpaid intern in New Times history. She left the Magic City for New York to earn her master’s degree from Columbia University School of Journalism, where she spent a year profiling circumcised men who were trying to regrow their foreskins for a story that ultimately won the John Horgan Award for Critical Science Journalism. Terrified by pizza rats and arctic temperatures, she quickly returned to her natural habitat.
Contact: Jess Swanson