Food News

The Daily Show's Sexiest Halloween Costume, Vagina Pizza (Video)

The common media trope these days is that women's costumes have gotten too sexy. The ubiquitous "Sexy Noun" costume is everywhere. While some backwards-thinking conservative prudes (cough-Jon-Stewart-cough) might suggest that things have gotten out of hand and these costumes are degrading to women, The Daily Show's Senior Women's Issue Correspondent Kristen Schaal sets him straight.

After all, as Schaal points out, women have only "this one night, only one out of the whole year to be viewed as sexual objects."

Forget sexy nurse or sexy prosecutor. If you are going to sexually objectify yourself, what better way than to become a sexy inanimate object?

Schaal has seen the future of sexy costumes for women, and she's not beating around the bush -- proverbial or otherwise.

"I don't think they go far enough. Ladies, why are we being so coy about this? Why don't we just show everyone what we mean when we put on those sexy kitty/carrot/nurse costumes and take things to obvious next level?

"I call this one the sexy vagina. And what better way to get everyone thinking of sex than to dress up as the place where sex happens?"

But we all know the one thing that makes giant vaginas sexier? Pepperoni. Catch the whole video.

But don't worry fellas, Schaal's got a sexy costume for you too.

You can contact Rebecca Dittmar, Arts & Culture Editor at [email protected].



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Rebecca McBane is the arts and culture/food editor for New Times Broward-Palm Beach. She began her journalism career at the Sun Sentinel's community newspaper offshoot, Forum Publishing Group, where she worked as the editorial assistant and wrote monthly features as well as the weekly library and literature column, "Shelf Life." After a brief stint bumming around London's East End (for no conceivable reason, according to her poor mother), she returned to real life and South Florida to start at New Times as the editorial assistant in 2009. A native Floridian, Rebecca avoids the sun and beach at all costs and can most often be found in a well-air-conditioned space with the glow of a laptop on her face.
Contact: Rebecca McBane