Cuba's Skateboarding Scene Continues to Grow

Cuba's Skateboarding Scene Continues to Grow

Fueled by a surge in charities doling out trucks, boards, and decks, skateboarding has exploded in Cuba over the past decade. Where once there was just a handful of tight-knit skaters in the Cuban capital, now there are hundreds flipping over crumbling curbs or grinding in the city's only skate park every weekend. Amigo Skate is a Miami-based skateboard charity led by Rene Lecour, a tattooed, bearded 48-year-old Cuban-American. On a recent trip to the island, Lecour arrived with 25 people, including artists, musicians, skaters, and activists from New York, California, and Miami. In addition to the skate contests, they held other meetups, both organized and impromptu.

Read more on the growing skateboarding scene in Cuba.

Photography by Emmy Park/emmypark.com


Fueled by a surge in charities doling out trucks, boards, and decks, skateboarding has exploded in Cuba over the past decade. Where once there was just a handful of tight-knit skaters in the Cuban capital, now there are hundreds flipping over crumbling curbs or grinding in the city's only skate park every weekend. Amigo Skate is a Miami-based skateboard charity led by Rene Lecour, a tattooed, bearded 48-year-old Cuban-American. On a recent trip to the island, Lecour arrived with 25 people, including artists, musicians, skaters, and activists from New York, California, and Miami. In addition to the skate contests, they held other meetups, both organized and impromptu.

Read more on the growing skateboarding scene in Cuba.

Photography by Emmy Park/emmypark.com
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