Taking Stock of Woodstock

Not everyone loves Woodstock. In his entertaining treatise X Saves the World, a Defense of Generation X, cultural critic Jeff Gordinier dismisses the legendary festival as "The Great Mythical Hippie Sludge Convocation." As a turn of phrase, this one's a keeper, but for the 500,000 people who attended the four-day festival in 1969, not to mention the millions who discovered the festival later, Gordinier's words have the sting of blasphemy. Yes, Woodstock was muddy, toxic, and overpopulated, but the music lineup was unparalleled, and it set the standard for the modern music festival. The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach will celebrate the festival's 43rd anniversary from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday during its weekly Art After Dark festivities. Rock photographer Elliott Landy, whose work is on display in the museum's "Clubs, Joints, and Honky-Tonks" exhibition, will talk with curator Tim Wride and classic-rock DJ Andy Preston about his experience shooting Woodstock, celebrated Grateful Dead cover band Crazy Fingers will perform from 7 to 9, and the Oscar-winning documentary Woodstock will screen throughout the evening, among other special events. The Norton is at 1451 S. Olive Ave. in West Palm Beach. Admission, half-off for the evening, is $6 adults and $2.50 students. Call 561-832-5196, or visit norton.org.
Thu., Aug. 16, 5-9 p.m., 2012
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John P. Thomason