Interviews

Manchester Orchestra's Andy Hull: "I Planned on Being in This Band Forever When I Started It"

Four years, three albums, and a good thousand shows later, Georgia's most roarsome quintet, Manchester Orchestra, returns to our neck of the hoods after last playing Revolution Live in 2010. But whereas it once performed back-to-back opening slots at that venue, supporting the likes of Silversun Pickups, this time, the band is heading out under the swampy stars that shine on Cruzan Amphitheatre. The occasion? The second-annual Coral Skies Music Festival, a one-state, two-date collision of crafted beer, trucked food, outsider art, and the very best indie rock has to offer today.

In addition to Manchester Orchestra, this year's edition of Coral Skies features Cage the Elephant, Julian Casablancas + the Voidz, Tokyo Police Club, and the Hold Steady. But it is M.O. that concerns us here, specifically its frontman, Andy Hull, who's given voice (and credence) to the Southern-plied rock gang since its inception.

Born and bred in Atlanta (excepting a seven-year stint in Ontario), Hull formed Manchester Orchestra as a solo endeavor that would include a revolving door of co-conspirators. The concept was titled (as Hull told New Times) after the town whose sound he found most dreary. That would be Manchester, U.K., natch, home of morose outfit the Smiths, among others. After turning Northern England's joyful desperation into inspiration, Hull wrote and recorded his first full-length, recruited teenaged bandmate Chris Freeman, and set about the task of taking over the world one stage at a time.

See also: Manchester Orchestra Plays Its First Headlining Show at Revolution

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John Hood