Economy

The Eight Most Expensive Properties for Rent Across South Florida

Before the housing bubble burst in 2008, the average person in the tri-county area spent only 28.5 percent of their income on rent. But by the end of 2015, that percentage shot up to 43.8 percent. After Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Miami metropolitan area is considered the third least affordable market in the country. 

For the most part, we're all struggling to make ends meet, balancing credit card and car payments. But it's still fun to imagine what flashy, exorbitantly priced property you'd chose to live in if you were diagnosed with a terminal illness and maxed out all your credit cards. So, rather than feel incredibly out of place at a bougie open house, the number-crunching team at Rent Cafe found the most expensive properties currently on the market in South Florida's most expensive cities for renters

Here are the eight most expensive properties for rent across South Florida:
8. Weston: 3460 Paddock Rd. ($15,000 per month)
As Broward's westernmost city, Weston may as well be Timbuktu. In order to lure people to live here, you'd need a house that comes with a wine room, private master outdoor lounge area, pool and spa, outdoor grill, and some idyllic lake views. Fortunately, such a place exists. Though $15,000 a month is a steep price, it has the lowest sticker price on the list. A bargain!
7. Boca Raton: 1000 S. Ocean Blvd. 602, ($35,000 per month)
Technically, this property has the fewest square feet. But what this property lacks in space, it makes up for in crazy expansive ocean views from every direction. Sure, you also have a private elevator, a master bath that really doubles as a spa, and even a "fireplace room" (in South Florida!?). But the best asset is being able to look down from your balcony at all the proles on the beach and laugh.
6. Coral Gables: 955 Journeys End Rd. ($38,000 per month)
For $38,000 you could rent this property for a month or help a struggling University of Miami student nearby by paying a semester's worth of tuition. But chances are the perks of the latter deal won't hook you up with a saltwater pool, a private dock, a tennis court, and the satisfaction of knowing you're living in a work of art (the architects who designed this house are the same guys masterplanning Nature City in Abu-Dhabi). 
5. Fort Lauderdale: 828 Solar Isle Dr. ($44,000 per month)
Wedged between Miami and Palm Beach, Broward has long been regarded as the spot where normal middle-class folks that haven't completely sold out for a house out west in the suburbs live. But for $44,000 a month, no regular middle-class folk will be living here: It's the most expensive property currently for rent in the entire county. Chew on that as you party on your yacht or soak in your oversize pool or jacuzzi.
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Jess Swanson is a staff writer at New Times. Born and raised in Miami, she graduated from the University of Miami’s School of Communication and wrote briefly for the student newspaper until realizing her true calling: pissing off fraternity brothers by reporting about their parties on her crime blog. Especially gifted in jumping rope and solving Rubik’s cubes, she also holds the title for longest stint as an unpaid intern in New Times history. She left the Magic City for New York to earn her master’s degree from Columbia University School of Journalism, where she spent a year profiling circumcised men who were trying to regrow their foreskins for a story that ultimately won the John Horgan Award for Critical Science Journalism. Terrified by pizza rats and arctic temperatures, she quickly returned to her natural habitat.
Contact: Jess Swanson