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Wild Bill's Jerky From The Jar: Way different than from the bag

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This week's post is purely the product of catchy packaging and weird wording. Clearly advertised as Jerky from the Jar, despite the fact it was in a plain plastic bag just like the 43 other varieties at the gas station, Wild Bill's still jumped off the shelf. Perhaps it's the see through mason jar window on the front, or maybe it's the geriatric Yosemite Sam caricature shooting his guns between "Made In" and "The U.S.A." Either way, it found its way into my hands and onto my desk.

What exactly makes jerky from the jar different than jerky from wherever the hell it normally comes from? According to the packaging, the jar has to be famous in order to make it different. "Hickory-Smoked beef jerky from our famous Mason jar." The jar is quite obviously famous because it sparkles, just like the font on the front of the bag. The package goes on to explain this jerky has a "freshness that tastes like it was just pulled from the smokehouse." Now I'm confused: Was it pulled out of a mason jar or a smokehouse. Or maybe it was a smokehouse shaped like a mason jar? These questions are making my brain hurt and the only cure for that it cured, dried meat. I tear open the bag and inhale.

Holy soy sauce! Literally the only thing I can smell coming out of this

bag is that brown, salty liquid that makes rice taste like heaven. No

hickory smell, no dried meat tinge, just unadulterated soy sauce. Of

course, beef jerky isn't known for having a fine bouquet, so I take out

a piece and chomp down.
The jerky is uneven. Some parts are perfect, tough enough to require a

hearty bite to tear off, but soft enough that your jaw doesn't hurt by

the time you're finished. Other strips are as chewy as rubber and some

are so soft they hardly require teeth. I suppose that's the big mason

jar difference. It does make it feel more homemade, but that's not

exactly a good thing. Sometimes, the experts just do it better than you

can at home.

The real testament to this jerky is the fact I actually finished the

bag. Never before have I tried something for this blog that I was able

to finish. Although it isn't the best beef jerky I've ever had, it's

far from the worst.

Who should eat this: Hardcore carnivores, mason jar enthusiasts, bloggers tired of things that make their stomach turn.

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